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Why Community Is The Last Great Marketing Strategy

Why Community Is The Last Great Marketing Strategy written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Mark Schaefer

Mark Schaefer, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing PodcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Mark Schaefer. Mark is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, college educator, marketing consultant, and author of books such as Marketing Rebellion – Cumulative Advantage, and Belonging To The Brand: Why Community Is The Last Great Marketing Strategy.

Key Takeaway:

Mark Schaefer argues that brand communities are the future of marketing strategy. In this episode, he highlights the major benefits of building community from a marketing perspective and the role they play in the world of business.

Questions I ask Mark Schaefer:

  • [2:03] What’s the difference between community and audience/customers?
  • [3:45] Would you say you don’t have community if people aren’t talking to each other?
  • [6:08] Would you say there are very few people that have actually activated a community in the way you’re talking about as a marketing strategy?
  • [8:18] There’s a real hunger nowadays for community wouldn’t you say?
  • [12:01]  You actually introduce a new idea that I hadn’t heard of but it’s the genesis of a business being community-based. That this is actually how it starts as opposed to it being a bolt-on channel – could you talk more about this idea?
  • [14:26] Why do you call this book the last great marketing strategy?
  • [16:32] You suggest that if you don’t start your community with purpose first, you’re doomed to fail right out of the gate. Could you expand on that idea?
  • [19:38] Talk a little bit about the technology aspect of a community from a practical standpoint – how does community management play into this?
  • [22:43] Where can more people learn about your work?

More About Mark Schaefer:

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John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Outbound Squad, hosted by Jason Bay and brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network. The audio destination for business professionals host Jason Bay, dives in with leading sales experts and top performing reps to share actionable tips and strategies to help you land more meetings with your ideal clients. In a recent episode called Quick Hacks to Personalize Your Outreach, he speaks with Ethan Parker about how to personalize your outreach in a more repeatable way. Something every single one of us has to do it. Listen to Outbound Squad, wherever you get your podcasts. Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch. My guest today is Mark Schaefer, a globally recognized keynote speaker, college educator, marketing consultant, author of books such as The Marketing Rebellion and Cumulative Advantage. But we’re gonna talk about his latest book today, belonging to the Brand, why Community is the Last Great Marketing Strategy. So Mark, welcome back to the show.

Mark Schaefer (01:17): Thank you, John. I love writing new books cuz it’s an excuse to talk to you. .

John Jantsch (01:22): . Well, I think this is at least your third appearance, if not Martha,

Mark Schaefer (01:25): At least. At least. Yeah. Yeah. And thankfully we do get a chance to talk to each other, you know, once in a while in between, but it’s always nice seeing

John Jantsch (01:33): You. That’s right. I did run into you recently. Where in Boston? Marketing? Boston.

Mark Schaefer (01:39): Oh, Maine.

John Jantsch (01:40): Oh, well is it been that long?

Mark Schaefer (01:42): I think it might have been Maine, yeah.

John Jantsch (01:44): Oh, okay. I thought we ran into each other at a, at another, another event more recent than that. That seems like eons ago. That was like pre covid.

Mark Schaefer (01:51): Well, that was pre Covid.

John Jantsch (01:53): , yeah. That’s gonna, that’s gonna be the new like, like BC and AD now it’s gonna be pre Covid, post Covid. I don’t know. All right, let’s get into your book. Um, first off, I want to get a definition what’s, I mean, what’s the difference between community and like audience or even customers?

Mark Schaefer (02:09): Yeah. Well I think that’s an important janan one I hit right up front in, in the book. You know, I think there a lot of people might have a blog or a podcast and they say, this is my community, but it’s really not. It’s an audience and that’s fine. There’s nothing wrong with that. I look, I owe a lot to my audience. I have a deep emotional connection with my audience, but it’s one way. Mm-hmm. . And if I go away, the audience goes away. It’s a sort of a cult of personality. The beauty of community is it brings the emotional connection to the brand to a new level. Because not only do people love you, they love each other in the group. I’m sure you experienced that with your own, you know, your duct tape community. So from, for, here’s something so interesting, John. I mean, I went down a lot of academic rabbit holes on psychology and sociology when I was writing this book. But it suggests that the bonds built in the community, that those friendships and that love spills over to the brand. It almost suggests it’s more important to build these relationships in a community than to build the relationship between the customer and the brand. And it builds this emotional switching cost. Because if people have friends in the community, well, I can’t leave this brand. These, this is my place, these are my people. So it’s really quite profound when you get into the marketing benefits of community.

John Jantsch (03:45): So a couple things I want to touch on that I heard you say, one of the key differences is, is instead of one to many, it’s a true network. Yeah. So to speak. And there’s not, well, there might be a leadership structure or guide, you know, it’s really the individual. Like you don’t have community if people aren’t talking to each other. Right.

Mark Schaefer (04:02): . Yeah. Yeah. And I, and it’s a great point that you make that when you talk about the leadership structure, and I think this is one of the most important values of the book, is it talks about really the new leadership mindset required this friend over in the UK who had a B2B marketing agency and he created this community and the community is now bigger than the company. He’s gone all in on this community. This is where he is getting his revenue. Yeah. And he said it’s so intimidating and disorienting to, you know, just all the stuff we learned at the university is turned upside down about leadership, about giving up control, about nurturing people. You’re not trying to build a staff. You’re trying to, you know, build leaders in your community. You know, in marketing that you and I do over the years, it’s ephemeral. You know, you have a campaign, right? When the money runs out, you start something else. A community, there’s like this implied social contract. Yeah. That’s new for marketing. , that’s new idea. But what I hope people get out of this book is that community isn’t added through the lens of brand marketing is. Yeah. You and I have been around a long time. When was the last time you and I, when was the last time you’ve been to a marketing conference where they’ve got a track on community and it’s this obvious opportunity staring as right in the face and it’s just almost completely overlooked by the world.

John Jantsch (05:44): Well it’s interesting because as you noted, well first off, you know, churches were communities, schools were communities, small towns, you know, talk about, you know, community. So as you said, we’ve always had that tribes and the initial native tribes were communities. But then when I think when we all went online, all of a sudden we had access to people outside of our community who believed the same thing we did. And so we have been talking even in marketing circles about community for, you know, at least 15. But I think there are very few people that have actually activated a community in the way that you’re talking about as a marketing strategy. ,

Mark Schaefer (06:23): Right? Yeah. I mean, if you remember when the internet began, the first thing a lot of people tried were communities, right? Coca-Cola I remember had a community, most of the big brands, even like one of the oil companies like Exxon had like a community thing, right? I mean you can see that why that wouldn’t work very well , but everybody tried it. But you know, in the early days they were built to try to sell stuff, right? They didn’t really have the right bandwidth. We didn’t have the right technology. You couldn’t do video and it just didn’t work. So most communities failed. The communities that survived. Almost all of them are transactional. It’s customer self-service. Oh, your problem with your software, go into our community. And I think the way the world, the reason the world went that way is because it’s easy to measure. You can see the ROI of that kind of community because it’s cost avoidance. And we completely overlook this idea of if we have like-minded people coming together, we can collaborate and co-create and it builds trust and it builds loyalty. And you’ve got customer advocacy and you have di a direct line to consumer information. And it, it’s just, I think I put together a very compelling case in the book to say, Hey, yeah, wake up and at least consider this idea.

John Jantsch (07:55): Well I know over the years, you know, I have sold for years, I’ve sold courses, I’ve sold training, I’ve done one-on-one. I will tell you some of the most beneficial programs that I’ve ever run have been small cohorts of people coming together Yeah. In a group. And I think that while I wouldn’t call that a community necessarily, even if we come together five or six times over, you know, so many months or something, people get very connected. And I think that that in some ways what I’m witnessing is just a real hunger that people have for this, right? I mean, it’s not just that people need to create this, it’s that there, there’s a real hunger. There’s a, you even start the book talking about, you know, a lot of this is driven out of loneliness, which has probably gotten far worse. , you know, for a lot of people that aren’t going into offices anymore.

Mark Schaefer (08:38): Yes. The first chapter of my book is probably the most depressing chapter in the history of different books, . Cause I start off talking about my own childhood loneliness and how I was lost. I I something happened to when I was a kid that just made me a shadow. It just, it made me someone just a ghost of a person. And then a miracle kind of happened in high school where I was embraced by a community and I was always haunted by this idea of what if that didn’t happen? I mean, I was going down this road of isolation and depression and this is why it’s significant. And this is one of the reasons I wrote the book. I saw this headline in the New York Times that said the loneliest generation talking about our children and our teenagers and the pandemic didn’t cause this. No. It was, it’s been creeping up actually for decades.

(09:38): But the pandemic really amplified things. And just like you said, that we’ve got generations like just living in their rooms. And one, one of my students said my, my my daughter graduated college the last year and a half of college was spent in her bedroom cuz it was remote. Then she got a job that was remote . She said the last this important two and a half years of her life, the big change in her life has been moving from one room to another. And she’s so lonely and she’s so desperate to see people. And so we are, we do long to belong. And I’m not being Pollyannish John, this is a business book. It’s based by data, it’s based by research. You know, that’s sort of a hallmark of my books. But there’s also this aspect that community heals. It not only works as a marketing idea, but it really heals.

(10:40): I mean we need this, as you say, psychologically, sociology, sociologically even there’s a little bit of research in the book that shows h helps us physically to be happy and belong. So I mean, it it, it is a business book, but I think it also sort of creates this sort of new meaning to marketing. We, it’s the only marketing I think our customers would actually embrace because they need it. And I think that’s a powerful idea. If you create not only marketing that works, but marketing that, that heals. That’s, that’s something that appeals to me. Hey,

John Jantsch (11:18): Marketing agency owners, you know, I can teach you the keys to doubling your business in just 90 days or your money back. Sound interesting. All you have to do is license our three step process that’s gonna allow you to make your competitors irrelevant, charge a premium for your services and scale perhaps without adding overhead. And here’s the best part. You can license this entire system for your agency by simply participating in an upcoming agency certification intensive look, why create the wheel? Use a set of tools that took us over 20 years to create. And you can have ’em today, check it out at dtm.world/certification. That’s DTM world slash certification. You actually introduced what for me was kind of a new, it’s probably not a new term, but it’s the genesis of a business being community based. That that actually being the way that it starts as opposed to a bolt on channel.

Mark Schaefer (12:18): Yeah. It was new for me and really inspirational. And I guess you’d have to say this was another sort of seed that was planted in the book. You know, I was writing, it was like 2018, I was writing Marketing Rebellion. So I was like on the lookout for new marketing models. Mm. And I was at the social media marketing world and was at this, uh, breakfast held by Andy Costadina, one of our mutual friends. Mm-hmm. and Dana Malstaff was there, first time I ever met her. She started telling me she had, she was an entrepreneur, she had been pregnant and didn’t feel like couldn’t find a lot of support for being a mom and being a business leader. So she created this Facebook group, cut Boss mom. Long story short, in the first nine months she was making a six figure income. She now has 70,000 members in this group.

(13:14): It’s nearly a million dollar business. She always corrected me. It’s not quite a million dollar. She said, mark, don’t call it a million dollar business. I’m almost there. But in a short period of time, her business has been doubling every year. No sales department, no marketing department, no marketing budget. Sort of a remarkable idea. She’s a, she’s created this million dollar business in a short period of time with no marketing budget. Because if you have this community of 70,000 people, she just, they just are eager to buy her courses, her videos, her events, her coaching, her workshops, because they believe in her. They love being in this place. They belong to her as a brand. And so she doesn’t have to sell. She was careful to say, I can sell . Right. Yeah. She knew it if she needs to, but she said I don’t need to.

John Jantsch (14:11): Yeah. I suspect a lot of people underestimate, you know, how much selling probably is, but not in the traditional negative way that we think about it. Yeah. Right, right. I mean you’re, you’re selling the vision, you know, of belonging and that’s, that’s still, you know, a sales job in some ways you call this, I mean it’s in the subtitle last great marketing strategy. So you, there’s nothing left. Like there’s no more. This is it.

Mark Schaefer (14:33): Well it’s gotta be my last book. Right? Well the reason, yeah, I know it’s a very, it’s a provocative subtitle, but this is the way I looked at it. First of all, it was the first marketing strategy. You know, when, you know, my, my grandparents lived in Pittsburgh and they shopped at these neighborhood stores and the people at those stores knew my grandparents, they knew their family, they knew their kids, they knew their birthdays. They would talk and it was a community. It was a community atmosphere. And I’m just one generation away from that and I’ve never experienced that and I just long to belong to something like that. So it was really the first way that the first marketing is you belong there. And I think we live in this community, in this world now where we have this streaming economy, you know, last night, you know, I was batching it last night, so I got on to Netflix and just binge some show and then, you know, tomorrow I’m going on a trip and I’m gonna listen to Spotify for hours and hours and I might listen to an audiobook and all these hours I’m consuming content.

(15:46): I am not going to hear one ad, I am not gonna hear one brand messaging. There’s gonna be no PR spin. And so we’ve gotta find something new. Yeah. And I think when all the interruptive advertising and the spam and the robocall finally go away, the last thing we’re gonna have is community. Because we’ve always had community, we’ve always needed community and we always will. And so I think this is the one thing in this fast, crazy world we can really count on. Our customers need this. And I think this could be a long lasting strategy if it’s done the right way.

John Jantsch (16:32): It’s one of the points that you make, I think in probably has its own whole chapter. If I recall, you know, I’m envisioning somebody listening to this going, we need to do community, we need to increase customer retention by 12%. So let’s start community. Yeah. And you suggest that actually if you don’t start with purpose first, yeah. You’re doomed to fail right outta the gate.

Mark Schaefer (16:53): Well, most communities fail. That’s the hard fact. And the main reason why they fail is because the communities are created to sell stuff. Right. And that’s great and we gotta do that, but it’s not a reason to gather. So you have to think about what is the intersection between what you do and what you believe in and this and the purpose of your customers. And one of the things I’m proud of in the book is I have dozens of brand new case studies, diverse b2b, b2c, big companies, you know, small companies. There’s even a stay-at-home mom with five kids that has a community of 50,000 people in this book. So it’s very inspirational. Yep. But I will rely on good old Harley Davidson. It’s a worn out example. But you know, here’s a, it’s a transportation company, but they don’t have these crazy ads. You know, we’re going crazy.

(17:56): Come down, it’s President’s Day sale. You’ll never hear that from Harley. You never will because they’ve got points of differentiation, right. About their look and the leather and all this stuff. But the purpose that unites them, and this is, this unifies that company and I have firsthand experience with this. I’ve worked with Harley Davidson. They are obsessed with everything they can do to make you a badass. That is what, that’s what if you wanna be a badass, they’re gonna help you do that. And that’s why they never need to have a sale. That’s why they’re never in your face with all these stupid ads. Because you know, you can really only be a badass if you have Arnold Davidson . Right. So it’s all based on this pur on this unifying purpose. You wanna be a badass, we wanna help you be a badass. And that’s the way it goes. So I spent a lot of time on this in the, in the book helping cus helping businesses think through what do you want to accomplish in the world? And you can do it better if you’ve got your customers with you. There’s lots of prompts I think to help businesses think that through. And, but it does, it, it it does start with a, not just a purpose, but really a unifying purpose.

John Jantsch (19:22): I hate to get too practical from go from purpose to tools , but you did kind of mention one of the challenges early on was we didn’t really have great tools for building community. You know, there’s a whole new breed of community platform cropping up through the, you know, I’m thinking of the circles, you know, of the world. Yeah. So talk to a little bit about both the technology but then also the practical standpoint. I think where a lot of communities fail is they think that you just put a bunch of people in there and they’re gonna like mingle. And so, you know, there has to be a community management aspect as well as the, you know, whatever the technology is, doesn’t there.

Mark Schaefer (19:57): Yeah. You know, in, in that part of the book, I stay pretty high level because,

John Jantsch (20:05): Because it’s all changed already. , it’s

Mark Schaefer (20:08): Changing

(20:09): And I can’t tell you what to do because Yeah, look some pe the only piece of advice I really give in the book is it’s probably going to help if you meet in a place that’s organic to your every, the everyday experience of your community. So if the people in your community, if they go to LinkedIn every day, maybe you should be on LinkedIn. If you go to Facebook or Twitter or Slack every day, maybe you should be there. Mm-hmm . Mm-hmm , my community is on Discord. I fought and kicked and screamed not to be on Discord , my community is about learning about the future of marketing and the community said, look, if we’re gonna learn about the future of marketing, we might as well learn about Discord. So I couldn’t argue with that. So there we are. The one thing I point out in the book that I think will be fascinating to any marketer is, are these new ideas about NFTs and Web three and the Metaverse?

(21:08): And I point out in this section of the book, talking about the future of the community, why many of the things we rely on in marketing today, like social listening platforms are gonna become obsolete in some ways They already are because Gen Z, they’re not on Facebook. Yeah. They’re not on LinkedIn. Even business majors. I gave a presentation to Esther’s degree students at Rutgers, almost none of them were even on LinkedIn. It’s like they resisted, where are they hanging out? Discord. Twitch arguably the biggest community in the world. I could even say Fortnite, right. Is a community. And guess what? They’re undetectable and like gens, when we talk about Gen Z, we’re not talking about babies. The first member of Gen Z just got elected. The Congress. Yeah. They’re here, they’re buying stuff, they’re gonna be our new leaders. You know, they punch way above their weight when it comes to culture and fashion and music and art. And I mean they’re having an incredible impact on our society and they’re invisible. And so, so, and I don’t have answers to that, but I think considering where these new communities are popping up, number one they, there’s an implication there for our own communities. Number two, there’s an implication there just to for finding these people cuz they are in communities. Yeah. But you and ie. You, you may never know it. Yeah.

John Jantsch (22:45): Speaking with Mark Schaffer on his wonderful new book, belonging to the Brand Mark, you want to tell people, I know the book’s available anywhere, but uh, you wanna invite people to connect with you in any fashion as well as check out the work you’re doing.

Mark Schaefer (22:55): Sure. Thanks so much John. You know, it’s just always a joy to speak to you. And so you can find me@businessesgrow.com. You’ll never remember how to spell Schaffer. You might not even remember how to spell Jan .

John Jantsch (23:10): I guarantee you we’ve both got the that S C H in common. But other

Mark Schaefer (23:14): Than that, yeah, you can remember Grow. And if you can remember that you can find my book, my blog, my podcast, my social media connections. And I’d love to hear from you. And John, thank you so much, as always.

John Jantsch (23:25): Well, I appreciate you taking a moment to stop by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast and hopefully we’ll run into you soon. Mark one of these days out there on the road. Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it@ marketingassessment.co. Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketing assessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

The Story Of A Young Entrepreneur Building A Better World With A Nonprofit

The Story Of A Young Entrepreneur Building A Better World With A Nonprofit written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Camden Francis

Camden Francis, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing PodcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Camden Francis. Camden is the Founder and CEO of the Nonprofit Organization Beyond the Crisis Beyond the Crisis, the food-distribution charity, which has distributed over 100,000 dollars of food items to housing communities and homeless shelters across Massachusetts.

Questions I ask Camden Francis:

  • [2:01] What was it that lead you to start ‘Beyond the Crisis’?
  • [2:20] What were some of the challenges along the way?
  • [3:33] What’s the actual function of the organization, and how does it work?
  • [5:25] When you were getting started, what was the hardest thing?
  • [6:26] Did you ever have a moment where you just felt like I just can’t do this anymore?
  • [7:24] Would you say that your youth or your age has been a help or a challenge or both?
  • [8:32] Was there also that moment or like one day that you remember where you said to yourself, this might actually just make it?
  • [9:33] What has been the most rewarding thing about this?
  • [11:20] What’s the vision for the future of the organization?
  • [14:09] Do you see yourself as an inspiration?
  • [14:51] What are your top three or four latest reads that you think everybody ought to read?
  • [15:45] Is there someplace you’d want to invite people to check out Beyond the Crisis or obviously any way to connect with you personally?

More About Camden Francis:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

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John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your s

John Jantsch (00:48): Hello.

John Jantsch (00:48): Welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jan, and my guest today is Camden Francis. He’s the founder and c e o of a nonprofit organization called Beyond the Crisis. It’s a few food distribution charity that’s distributed over $100,000 of food items to housing communities and homeless shelters across Massachusetts. I should also tell you that Camden is 18 years old. His nonprofit Beyond the Crisis landed him on the Drew Barrymore talk show, Bloomberg Radio podcast, numerous podcasts with npr, including All Things Considered. So we’re gonna talk about his entrepreneurial journey. So Camden, thanks for joining me.

Camden Francis (01:28): Thanks so much for having me. It’s a pleasure to be here.

John Jantsch (01:31): Well, I, I have to say you, you have a, you earned an honor. You are the youngest guest I think I’ve ever had on the show. Wow. I betcha I’m not the first person that’s told you that though. Oh, you’re, you’re pretty young to get started in accomplishment. It’s, yeah, yeah. It’s what you’ve accomplished at such a young age is newsworthy, so that’s why you’re making it on these shows. So let me, let me ask you about Beyond the Crisis, going back to when you started it, cuz I know you’ve been doing this for at this for a little while. What, I mean, what was it that led you to start, what, what made you say I need to do this thing?

Camden Francis (02:02): So it was really at the height of the pandemic. I’m very ambitious. I’m an entrepreneurial minded kid, but I really wanted to do something to help my community. So it was that combined with like entrepreneurship that really turned an idea into like a mobilization to really help families in need.

John Jantsch (02:20): Yeah. So talk a little bit about the start of it. Was it, you know, talk a little bit about the challenges. I mean, starting any entrepreneurial venture is a challenge. So what were some of the challenges? And then maybe kind of talk a little bit about the day-to-day what, what the organization actually does on a day-to-day basis.

Camden Francis (02:37): Yeah, so kind of during the, like the days of like founding this organization, I did it with my 13 year old brother. We were so young at the time. One of the things that we did was we got a mentor so we reached out. I have a great network. I’m very fortunate. My dad also is an entrepreneur himself, so that’s helpful. But I reached out to the CEO of Y M C A in Metro North region. Her name is Kathleen Walsh, she’s my mentor to date with the nonprofit. And that really helped us not fall into too many kind of pitfalls because like we kind of bootstrapped the organization, which means we self-funded it and with resources from a 13 year old and at the time I was 16. So it’s pretty amazing that today we’re able to distribute a hundred thousand dollars worth of food items. But it really goes to show you that kind of it you, if you put your mind to something and if you get the right partners in place, you really have good people behind you and a community that really can use your idea, it’s marketable and it can really help people then it can really go far.

John Jantsch (03:33): Yeah. So talk a little bit about the day-to-day, what, you know, what’s the actual function of the organization, how does it work?

Camden Francis (03:39): So day-to-day what we do is we kind of reach out to kind of housing communities and homeless shelters across Massachusetts that can really use kind of food items. So we kind of have them fill out surveys and they get back to us with kind of what they need. And usually we can fulfill those requirements because we also have sponsors in place. We have sponsors in a trustee board. The trustee board is what we took from like colleges. We saw colleges and universities. They have kind of dedicated donors like every month that really believed in the mission and the CO that they’re supporting. And we saw why can’t we do this at a nonprofit level? So that’s really helping us. But yeah, also our corporate spots is a really great, they’re kind of large kind of food brands and they kind of can help with the specific food donations necessary.

(04:24): But we have a great network. We’re kind of linked with kind of governors, congressmen. One of our most strategic donors right, is Jim McGovern, who’s kind of a huge advocate for kind of the US and global food insecurity, health and nutrition. And also we’re heavily involved at even a national level with the podcast outreach. I mean the media outreach that we’ve done. And we’re kind of also involved with the White House and helping them kind of strategically use some of our research because what we’ve found is we’re food distribution charity, which is pretty unique because we’ve found that there’s actually enough food to go around, but families lack access to available food elsewhere. And a lot of food right now is just getting wasted. So we have people on our team working with food recirculation, so kind of taking food from restaurants that isn’t really used and will go to waste and redistributing it to soup kitchens. And we have people on the ground who are drivers kind of delivering the food from point A to point B. And then we have the operations on the executive board who kind of handles the operations of the

John Jantsch (05:25): Organization. What was, I mean o obviously listening to you describe what you’ve accomplished really in a fairly short time. But when you were getting started, what was the hardest thing and and again, think of anybody starting any entrepreneurial venture, what was the hardest thing for you?

Camden Francis (05:39): I would say in the most humble manner, because I was so young, I knew that I didn’t have right the knowledge that a lot of 40 and 50 year old entrepreneurs had. And it wasn’t necessarily naive to say, but it was like the ability to kind of make mistakes that was really scary. It’s scary for entrepreneurs in general, right? They don’t always know if their idea’s gonna work out. But being at such a young age, you hear feedback from like other people in your inner circle, family and friends and there’s like, they’re like, yeah, right, like this isn’t gonna happen. But really seeing kind of the progress that we’ve made so far and saying really focused and present has really been a blessing for me, my brother and the other people around this organization and my family as a whole. So it’s great seeing it come together.

John Jantsch (06:26): Was there ever a time you felt like chucking it? It’s like why am I bothering, this is just too hard. I mean, I know what I was doing when I was 16, 17 years old, , there was a lot of other things that, you know, that I wanted to go do. I mean, did you ever have a moment where you just felt like, I just can’t do this anymore

Camden Francis (06:43): many times because it was really during the beginning that we, I’ve had that moment now, not so much because I see kind of what it’s doing for families, right? Who really could use and benefit from it. But during the beginning when like my friends kind of wanted to hang out constantly and some of the plans I couldn’t make, it was definitely hard to kind of make those sacrifices. But knowing that they paid off to date is really great. But yeah, I really, I did this nonprofit to learn about to, in addition to help people to learn about entrepreneurship as a whole. And I’m currently launching a, like a tech startup right now that’s even more kind of, I would say interesting and almost unique.

John Jantsch (07:24): Awesome. So would you say you are, you hinted at this a little bit, talking about how in some ways you were so young that you didn’t know what you didn’t know and you weren’t afraid to like ask because you weren’t maybe embarrassed by, you know, by not knowing. Would you say that your youth or your age has been a help or a challenge or both?

Camden Francis (07:45): It’s definitely allowed me a platform, right? To really kind of tell my story to uh, kind of communicate what I’ve done and what I plan to do and kind of how I plan to continue to help families in need. That’s really the main goal of the organization and it’s really important with nonprofits to just really stay focused on the goal. Why are you doing it and how can it help people? But being so young in the beginning, I really wasn’t taking seriously, I was sending so many emails they were getting bounced back, rejected, rescinded ghosts. But yeah, it really kind of gave me perseverance and it’s good to be young and kind of have developed these skill sets early on. So when you’re older you kind of have this knowledge, you have skillsets developed and you can really kind of make an even bigger difference because that’s what I plan to

John Jantsch (08:31): Dos. So was there also, I talked, I asked you if there was time you felt like quitting. Was there also that moment or like one day that you remember, you know, maybe you got some buddy to say yes, you know what where you, where you said yourself, this might actually just make it.

Camden Francis (08:46): Yeah, I, for us, really one of the greatest days for us is kind of being on the Drew Barmore show and being able to tell our story mainstream in front of a live audience and have it also make national coverage on c V s. And that was kind of like a breaking point because at that point we kind of had an audience, we, we had listeners, we got volunteer opportunities from that, more donors, we had partner opportunities. I had the ability to network with even um, more powerful influential people such as CEOs of companies. You name it like governors. It was, yeah, it was a really kind of, when I look back at it, it was a almost gonna be a core memory probably in my experience as a young entrepreneur. But yeah, there it’s been a rollercoaster ride

John Jantsch (09:33): And now word from our sponsor. Look, if you’re anything like me or every other entrepreneur out there, your 2023 is probably off to a rock and start. And as a leader it could be challenging to align your teams on a shared mission and goals for the new year. But with HubSpot’s crm, you can keep your marketing, sales, operations and service teams in sync on one powerful platform that grows with your business and leaves your competition in the dust. Capture leads. Boost sales and engage customers all from one powerful platform. Tools like a unified contact record, help desk, automation and customizable reporting make it easy to unite your team around a single source of truth, which means you can spend less time managing your software and more time connecting with your customers. Learn how HubSpot can make your business grow better @ hubspot.com. So

John Jantsch (10:31): What would you say, and I think you’ve already hinted at this, but I’m gonna ask you anyway, has been the most rewarding thing about doing this, putting in the work?

Camden Francis (10:39): I would say the most, yeah, the most rewarding thing for me was kind of doing it with my younger brother. We’re so close, we’ve gained so much knowledge about entrepreneurship and just having him as a partner. You know, we’re very close and eventually kind of when our parents kind of pass us on the baton, it’s really great to have like a best friend who you can trust and who you can bounce ideas with, idea with and just grow together. And I would say that’s definitely one of the best things for me.

John Jantsch (11:10): Yeah, that’s awesome. So I think I read this somewhere, your college bound?

Camden Francis (11:19): I am, yeah. So I currently applied waiting to hear back. I applied to a select number of colleges, a few Ivys, Vanderbilt over in Tennessee. I applied to Duke, so like top, top colleges and I’m playing to, I study either entrepreneurship or finance. So yeah, it’s exciting waiting to hear back, but

John Jantsch (11:38): So what does that mean? Assuming you’re gonna go off, what does that mean for the organization?

Camden Francis (11:43): Yeah, so right now because of how we run the organization, a lot of our kind of staff are virtual and we have a really great volunteer base. But we’re planning to grow the organization super organically. And what that’s gonna allow us to do is kind of just keep growing at small and steady rates and keep making a small impact. When I’m in college, we’re probably not going to grow and scale anymore, but we know that we can kind of retain what we have and continue to help like a specific number of families, which we’ve already kind of kind of assessed and worked through. So

John Jantsch (12:17): Yeah, so that was my next question was, you know, what’s the vision for the future for the organization? But it sounds to me like you almost want to take where you are now and just get better at doing what you’re doing

Camden Francis (12:27): Exactly. But we also have vision for the future. We really wanna stay focused, stay present, but we really want to turn it into a family foundation to kind of establish a a long lasting legacy of giving and have something in the family where either I can donate time or resources to my brother or kind of even maybe 10 years down the road, who knows if the organization’s still gonna be running, but kind of having this be like a family thing. Like the Francis family founded this and this is what we do, here’s our impact and kind of this is our legacy. So that’s the play.

John Jantsch (13:01): So little bro, you’re ceo, is that it now?

Camden Francis (13:04): Yeah, I think I’m gonna give my brother some of the reigns for sure. I’ll definitely be on call helping out. It’s great kind of with Zoom and Google Meet and all these apps, right? You can kind of do conferencing like we’re doing now. But yeah, I think that I’ll just kind of keep it small, keep it manageable, that’s really kind of the main thing.

John Jantsch (13:22): So are you able to talk about the tech startup that you’re working

Camden Francis (13:25): On? There’s a lot of disclosure around it, but I can give a few specific kind of details and really what I’ll go into, I’m not gonna go into the design aspect of it because it’s very, but we’re gonna almost our kind of like partner or the organization, our main competitor is gonna be LinkedIn and we’re gonna make this app almost like kind of how Facebook started it around college campuses. LinkedIn is, it’s a great app, but I’m finding that it’s hard to find internships on the, on the app. It’s hard to find job opportunities, especially for really young, talented, um, individuals and students out of college, right out of college. So by making a platform that’s very user-friendly and allowing it to be college-based, have students kind of make groups and be able to kind of establish whether that be like whatever groups, life groups, fitness groups, stuff like that.

(14:19): And in addition, it would be a great networking app, which is also, which also allows students to kind of not just waste mindless hours on social media, but kind of use social media to kind of allow themselves to impact their futures and really kind of create core connections. And then with that corporations, right, we can go on our app and they’ll pay us like a fee, a costing fee, but over time, right? If we get corporations, large corporations, there’s so many of them costing fee or if you have their fee, the retention there is going to be pretty great. And also if we kind of get, get a user base right when these users grow up, it could be the next big app because they’re gonna already know how to use it, they’re gonna be familiar with it, these college students, then they’re gonna get maybe older thirties, forties, then their kids are gonna also be familiar with it. So it’s a great time to launch something like this.

John Jantsch (15:07): Awesome. So here’s the hardest question I’ll save for last. Do you see yourself as an inspiration be seen as such?

Camden Francis (15:13): I’m so humble that I’m really trying to grow my skillset, grow my mindset, stay concentrated, stay focused, and in the future who knows where life will take me. But as of right now, I’m so grateful for the work I’ve done so far and I’m very motivated. It’s great kind of to have motivation when I wake up in the morning, I’m excited, I’m ready to go. And that’s just, it’s great. It’s really great and I’m super blessed for it. But eventually I plan to kind of keep growing my platform too.

John Jantsch (15:45): Are you a reader?

Camden Francis (15:47): I am, yes.

John Jantsch (15:48): Yes. So, so where, what books does give us your top three or four latest reads that you think everybody ought to

Camden Francis (15:55): Read? Yeah, off the top of my head, I think I might have a few of ’em listed somewhere. Hold on one sec. Sure. Sorry about the delay here. I just, off the top of my head, hard to remember. Okay. So How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. That’s on my list.

John Jantsch (16:14): That book’s older than Me even. Yeah,

Camden Francis (16:17): great book. It’s a Relic, the lead startup Crushing it by Gary Vaynerchuk. And then I also am big into podcasts, so I look at kind of the Harvard Business Review and kind of how this was made podcast and a few other podcasts such as that. But yeah, I’m a big reader. I love to kind of learn and that’s kind of how I ideate how I get these ideas, how I network big part of. Awesome.

John Jantsch (16:41): Awesome. So Camden, tell people, is there someplace you’d wanna invite people to check out beyond the Crisis or obviously any way to connect with you personally?

Camden Francis (16:50): Yeah, sure. So I have LinkedIn, a Camden Francis, uh, you could go check me out there. I’d love to connect. I’d love to answer questions regarding the organization, what I do, and also be on the crisis’s website. Go check this out. www.beyondthecrisis.org. Everything’s up there. Yeah.

John Jantsch (17:06): Awesome. Well, Camden, I appreciate you taking a few moments to stop by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast and good luck wherever your next ventures Legion. Maybe we’ll run into you one of these days out there on the road.

Camden Francis (17:16): Yeah, maybe. So thanks again for having me. It’s a pleasure.

John Jantsch (17:29): Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it it @ marketingassessment.co. check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketing assessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

The Secret To Attracting Your Ideal, High-Ticket Clients

The Secret To Attracting Your Ideal, High-Ticket Clients written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Russ Ruffino

In this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Russ Ruffino. Russ is the Founder of Clients on Demand, an Inc. 500 company that helps coaches, experts, and service providers attract the right clients at the right price, anytime they want.

Key Takeaway:

If you’re looking for some serious advice on how to attract high-paying clients and not sure where to start, Russ Ruffino—the mastermind behind Inc. 500 company Clients on Demand joins me to share exactly what it takes to appeal to (and secure) your ideal client at just the right price. He’s sharing the expert tips that could change everything about how you do business.

Questions I ask Russ Ruffino:

  • [1:30] Could you tell us more about your story?
  • [5:08] What are the mistakes people in the industry (coaches, consultants, small agencies) are typically making when they come to you?
  • [7:32] What has to be in place in order for people to want to pay you twice as much?
  • [12:08] What does it take though to build trust?
  • [14:43] Do you absolutely need to have a niche?
  • [15:35] Let’s talk a little bit about your client attraction system – is there an approach that you think for selling high-ticket items is the way to go right now?
  • [19:36] Let’s say I’m a management consultant – do you feel like this approach can work for somebody that’s doing high ticket but maybe one-on-one or not necessarily the traditional coaching industry?
  • [21:55] Where can people find out more about the work that you’re doing and more about you?

More About Russ Ruffino:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes, packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts. Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch, and my guest today is Russ Ruffino. He’s the founder of Clients on Demand and Inc. 500 company that helps coaches, experts, and service providers attract the right clients at the right price anytime they want. So, Russ, welcome to the show.

Russ Ruffino (01:07): Thank you. It’s great to be here.

John Jantsch (01:09): So, listeners, this is the Construction Zone episode that you might be hearing some background noise, but hey, you know, the show must go on. We’re professionals here. We can work through this. So, so Russ, tell me a little bit about your, I told in the bio, I told you what you do now. Sure. I’d love to hear a little bit of your story. Like everybody has a great story of how they got here, .

Russ Ruffino (01:30): Yeah, my, I mean, my story’s all right. It’s, I should probably just make up something more exciting. But basically I, I was a bartender in Los Angeles from age 21 to age 31. I was there in LA because I wanted to do acting. And when you’re, you wanna do acting, you’re waiting tables, you’re giving massages your personal training, you’re bartending, you’re doing something right. And I turned 30 and things just were not going my way in terms of my career. And I, you know, I just had no idea what I was gonna do. So one day I was on break at work and I walked into Barnes and Noble and right there sitting on the shelf was before hour work week by Tim Ferris. And I originally thought, what the hell is that four hour work week? That sounds like nonsense, but I’m interested enough that I’ll pick it up and read it.

(02:12): And that book really introduced me to this idea of, um, making an online income, making a passive income online. I didn’t even know that was possible until I read that book. And so I said to myself, look man, I, you know, come hell or high water, I’m gonna figure out a way to make this work. I’m gonna figure out how to do this. So I started doing just a little bit of online marketing, a little bit of affiliate marketing here and there. Started making a little bit of money doing it. I think I was making maybe like $500 a month maybe. And then one day at work I got, I really got into it with my manager and, and I wanted to tell ’em off. And I, I didn’t have the guts to do it. And I went home and I told my, my, my girlfriend, who’s now my wife, I said, David, you know, I got in a big fight with my boss and I really wanted to tell him off.

(02:48): I didn’t do it. And I just, I feel like I’m being a worse to myself. And she looks at me dead in the eye and she goes, you gotta quit. And I was like, okay. And she had just lost her job two weeks before. And it’s not like, again, I wasn’t making a fortune online. I was making $500 a month, maybe, which is certainly not enough to live on when you’re in la. I think my rent was like two grand or $2,400. Crazy. Yeah, I’m crazy like that. But I said to myself, look man, I bet that if I try to do this full-time that I, I can make it work. So I walked in there, equipment bartending job, woke up the next morning, you know, I went to bed feeling incredible and proud of myself. Woke up the next morning, terrified in terror cuz I didn’t have enough to cover rent, literally the next month.

(03:28): But, you know, long story short, I went to work making money online and I could just do it. I could write copy, I could do sales letters, I could do sales videos, I could do. And I had never done any of these things before. There was an actor and a bartender. I had no idea about marketing. But I ended up doing $250,000 my very first year and, um, changed my life. So then I went on to create my own low ticket products. And the problem then I realized in doing launches, and I realized the problem with low ticket and launches is it generally speaking, people don’t do anything, right. They’ll buy your $27 program, your $97 program, they’ll watch it. They’ll say, oh John, that program was awesome. I’ll rush. That program was awesome. And you’ll say, did you do anything? You know, did you take action?

(04:04): No, not really. I’ll get around to it. . So I asked myself, look, you know, what would happen if I flipped this model on its head? And instead of trying to work with thousands of people to low ticket price, what if I started charging five or eight or $10,000 to work with me? And I started working with fewer people. And uh, that’s what I did. And I guessed that if I did that I would probably be able to work with a lot fewer clients that I’d be able to make more money, that those clients would be more committed and they’d give better result. And that’s exactly what happened. So when I first switched from low ticket to high ticket, I did $200,000 that first month. And then I haven’t looked back since. And today the business is doing, you know, well into the eight figures. And it’s just amazing. You know, the was, people are now, they’re getting results, now they’re taking action, now they’re doing the work. And it’s, it’s just unlocked a whole new level of joy in this work because now I can see the difference it’s making in people’s lives. And that’s really what gets you outta bed in the morning.

John Jantsch (04:52): Yeah. So you like a lot of people, I mean, you figured out how to do something and then all of a sudden it’s like, hey, there’s a lot of people that need this. I can teach this to other people as well. So that’s really become your business hasn’t, is teaching other people how to do what you discovered how to do. Right,

Russ Ruffino (05:06): Exactly. Yeah.

John Jantsch (05:08): So talk a little bit about some of the, like when people come to you, you’re probably seeing the same mistakes over and over again. They clearly you’re, you know, set up to fix mm-hmm. . But how do people typically come to you? And we’re talking about coaches, we’re talking about consultants. Sure. Maybe small agencies. So talk a little bit about like the mistakes they’re making.

Russ Ruffino (05:27): Well, most of the time right outta the gate, they’re undercharging. And so they decide to get into coaching and they look around in their, in their space. There’s usually some other people that are already doing this. You know, if you’re a marriage coach, you’re not gonna be the first marriage coach the world is ever seen. You know, there’s other people doing this. And so the mistake they make is they look at those other people and they go, God, you know, that person’s got better branding than me and all, they got better pictures than me. And maybe they’re better looking than me and their website’s a little nicer and everything. And they’ve got all these followers on YouTube and Instagram. Oh man. And their program is a thousand dollars. So how so I better price mine at 700 bucks or whatever. And what we teach our clients is that what your competition is doing is irrelevant.

(06:05): Because fundamentally what people are buying from you is not your knowledge, it’s not your expertise, it’s not your time. What they’re buying is an outcome. There’s a certain result that they want to achieve in their life. And that’s the value you provide. And so what that means, John, is that all of your pricing should be based on what it’s worth to have that outcome. Like if you can really save someone’s marriage, what is that worth? You know? I mean, it’s priceless, right? So of course you can charge five or eight or $10,000 for your work. And when you do that, now all of a sudden, like I was saying, you can get, you can work with fewer clients. They show up committed, they show up resourceful. You know, you can give ’em a real v i p experience and actually get people the outcome, actually get people the result.

(06:46): So the first mistake is that they’re undercharging. And then I’d say the second mistake I see is that a lot of them don’t have a client attraction system. They’re depending on word of mouth, they’re depending on referrals. And they, people are very proud of that fact, well I haven’t, I’ve never had to advertise and I get all my clients through referrals. I’m like, and that’s great, you should be proud of that. But PS it also means you can’t scale because you’re constantly gonna be going to your clients. Do you know anybody else you could send to me? Do you know anybody else? And eventually they’re gonna be like, no dude, I’ve referred everybody that I can. So unless you have the ability to run ads on Facebook or Instagram or YouTube or TikTok or wherever and turn those ads into new clients, you know, you have a business but it’s not a business you can scale. And, but when you do know how to do that, you’ve got something you can build up to a hundred K a month, 500 K a month, even up to like 1000001.5 million a month because now you can turn advertising into dollars. Does that make sense?

John Jantsch (07:32): Yeah, absolutely. But you hit on a really key issue. I think a lot of people don’t think about outcome. They don’t think about the problem they’re solving. They think about the thing they’re selling. Mm-hmm. . And I think until they can get over that, you know, they’ll never really, because I, you know, I tell people all the time, raise your prices and they’re like, I don’t how. Right? So, you know, it’s not, I mean, it’s really nice for you and I to sit around and say, you should double your prices. Right? . But people are like, okay, how do I do that? What it has to be in place in order for people to wanna pay me twice as much?

Russ Ruffino (07:59): That’s a great question. So, and I really think you actually just hit the nail right on the head, is that people put all of their attention on what they’re selling. Meaning the course, the program, what are the bonuses? What are, what’s the, you know, whatever, it’s an eight week program, you know, it’s a 12 week program, you know, it’s a six month program or now getting into the, you know, the guarantee if you don’t get results all come to your house and wash your car or whatever, you know, what you are selling is the outcome. And that is what you need to build all of your communication around, right? Like again, using the example of a maybe a marriage and family therapist. In fact, I have a client who’s a marriage and family therapist. She was a marriage and family therapist in Australia. I think she was charging a hundred dollars an hour.

(08:36): She was seeing couples in her office. I think they were making about $70,000 a year doing that. She came to work with us, I believe it was four years ago. And we took her whole business online and now she’s doing a million dollars a month. So, so getting her to understand that it wasn’t an hour of her time that people were buying, cuz that was what all of the marketing, all the communication was around. And so the customer understood, well, I’m buying an hour over time, you reorient all of your communication to make it crystal clear that what they’re buying from you is a saved marriage. You know, what they’re buying from you is to lose 30 pounds. What they’re buying from you is to have a business that works, whatever it might be, and then you charge accordingly. And believe it or not, that reassures people that you are the best of the best. And that’s something that I think people need to understand. Doesn’t matter if you’re just starting out, what matters is can you get them the outcome? And are you building all your communication around that?

John Jantsch (09:27): Yeah. And I actually see the other side of like, there’s also this belief of well, it, it’s too good to be true. It’s too cheap. Like, you know why you surely can’t get me the result, right? Of

Russ Ruffino (09:36): Course that’s so common. Because the thing is like, if you are a coach, then chances are you solve some of the biggest challenges in life or in business. You know, you’re a dating coach and you help people find the love of their life. You’re a trainer, you help people get into amazing shape, you’re a nutritionist, you help people get into shape and fix their autoimmune conditions, whatever else they have going on. All of those outcomes are priceless. And so if I come to you and I go, listen, I’m gonna help you do this. We’re gonna work together for eight weeks, but at the end of that eight weeks, you’re, you are not gonna recognize your marriage. You are gonna be in a completely different level of love. And you know, with your wife and attraction and passion and PS it’s eight grand. Now I’m gonna take you seriously. No.

John Jantsch (10:08): Yeah. And I think that that, you know, the part that I see people, you know, they just, they don’t like just what you said. We’re so used to selling time or we’re selling a product, you know, that’s tangible. And I think that if you can get somebody a result, I don’t care what it costs. Like if I got a million dollar problem and you could solve that crisis is way down the list.

Russ Ruffino (10:28): Mm-hmm. people need to understand that, especially if it’s a million dollar problem and you’re charging ’em ak, then it’s a steal. And you think to yourself, well $8,000 is a lot of money to save your marriage. No, I mean I got a client, a Jamie who works with teenage girls that are having some serious problems and the parents hire her to work with the daughter and work with the parents to restore that relationship and get the kid back on track. Now look, I don’t have any teenage kids yet. My oldest is seven. But if I was in that situation, I’d mortgage my house, I would sell, I’d sell my other three kids just to save the one kid . But like you do whatever you have to do to get that outcome because you got no choice. It’s your kid. If someone’s gonna charge me a hundred dollars an hour, I’m sitting there going, God, you know, I hope this works. But if somebody comes in and says, Hey look, we’re gonna work with your child for 12 weeks, it’s $10,000, but your entire relationship with them will be transformed. Now I’m, now you’re talking, that’s what I want.

John Jantsch (11:21): Hey, marketing agency owners, you know, I can teach you the keys to doubling your business in just 90 days or your money back. Sound interesting. All you have to do is license our three step process that’s going to allow you to make your competitors irrelevant, charge a premium for your services and scale perhaps without adding overhead. And here’s the best part. You can license this entire system for your agency by simply participating in an upcoming agency certification intensive look, why create the wheel? Use a set of tools that took us over 20 years to create. And you can have ’em today, check it out at dtm.world/certification. That’s dtm.world/certification. What does it take though to build the trust? I mean, right, I’ve got a million dollar problem, but how do I know you can solve it? I mean, what’s it take to like get to that high ticket trust?

Russ Ruffino (12:16): So this is the thing that no one seems to understand. The conventional wisdom out there in the marketplace says that if you want to have high ticket clients, then you really need to spend a lot of time in energy building your authority. You need, you know, a million followers on Instagram, a million followers on YouTube. You need to hit podcast, you need New York Times bestseller, you need 50 different things. And uh, that’s what everyone told me when I was first starting in high ticket. And I said to myself, well you know, God, I don’t have any of those things. So let me try and do this without any of those things. And let’s see, let’s see what happens. And I’m really happy to be able to come and report to you that you don’t need any of that stuff. The truth is that if you want to establish your authority, you only need one thing.

(12:54): And that’s empathy. Empathy. So when you come onto one of our webinars, mine or one of the ones that we create for our clients or one of our marketing pieces, what you’re gonna hear is you’re gonna hear that marriage coach describing your problem better than you can. You know, maybe saying something like this, does this sound like you do? You wake up every morning 10 inches away from the love of your life, but you feel like there’s miles separating you. And every day that gulf is getting bigger and bigger. And if you’re in that situation, you’re like, yeah, that’s exactly how I feel. You know, has your situation between you and your wife gone from being, you know, F but lovers to friends now to roommates and you have no idea how it happened. You know what I mean by describing your problem where you’re going? Yes. That’s exactly what I’m going through. Your immediate reaction is that this person must have the answer, right? So if I can describe your problems

John Jantsch (13:43): Better they they get me. Yeah.

Russ Ruffino (13:45): Right? Yeah, exactly Right. And there’s this thing that people have where we assu, you know, when we hear someone describe our problems better than we can, we automatically assume they know the answer. And so by creating that empathy and that connection at the beginning of the webinar, right, where like, I don’t have to talk about myself. I don’t have to talk about my accolades, I don’t have to talk about how great I am. I don’t have talk about you. Let’s talk about you and your problems and I will tell you what you’re going through and once you, I accurately describe what you’re going through and then I can tell you, look, and then I bet you’ve tried this and you’ve tried this and you’ve tried this other thing and none of that’s worked and here’s why. And here’s the thing that will work. Now you’re gonna wanna work with me. And so all of that time building up your authority, you can do that in a 10, 15, 20 minute video, a 40 minute webinar, something like that. You can do it very fast.

John Jantsch (14:27): So common vice right now is, you know, niche, you gotta have a niche, right? I think I go back and forth on that. I mean, I like to work with people I like to work with, not necessarily dentists. Mm-hmm , that’s the wrong with dentist, but . But I like, you know, I like working with people who have the values. I have the same, you know, beliefs I have. So, you know, do you absolutely need to have a niche?

Russ Ruffino (14:47): So what you do is we don’t start with the niche. What we start is what is that problem that you solve? And then once I know what that is, I can ask you, well who do you most want to solve it for? Or who is the, what is the piece of that audience that you most wanna work with, right? So you don’t have to niche down again, I’m just gonna beat the marriage example to death cuz that’s something everyone understands. You know, maybe you are, maybe you’re really Christian and you tell me like, hey Russ, you know, I want to do, I want to, I wanna help people save their marriage, but I really wanna work with Christian couples. Sure you can absolutely do that. On the other hand, if you’re like, you know, I don’t care if they’re a Christian, Muslim atheists, you know, or whatever down, I’ll help them. I’ll work with ’em to save their marriage. So y you don’t need to narrow down in that way, but if you want to, you usually can. But it’s more about what’s the problem you solve and who’s got that problem.

John Jantsch (15:35): Let’s talk a little bit about your client attraction system. I mean, is there one channel, you’ve already said you don’t need to have a thousand or million followers and this and that. So is there a, an approach that you think for selling high ticket items is the way to go right now?

Russ Ruffino (15:48): Yeah, absolutely. So the best method that we have found to attract high ticket clients is to run ads on social media. So that’s Facebook and YouTube and Instagram are the three best right now TikTok is looking pretty good, but it’s a little bit inconsistent right now cause they keep changing things. So you got those four platforms there, you run ads on those four platforms, you drive that traffic into like a 20 minute presentation. So it could be a video, they could be automated webinar, whatever, but for 20 minutes they’re gonna sit there and listen to you do what I just said. Where you’re connecting with them, you’re showing that empathy, you’re explaining to them why the other stuff they’ve tried has not worked and can’t work. And then what you’ve got instead and why that approach is better. And then you offer them the chance to book a call with you, Hey, you know, if you wanna learn more about how you can apply this stuff to your marriage and get things turned around, you know, click here to book a call and that’s it. Then you get on the phone with them and in one conversation you can enroll them into your five or eight or $10,000 programs. So one of the things that we do that’s different than most other coaches, we don’t teach our clients to do a lot of follow up. I saw a guy the other day saying, well if you wanna make sales on the phone, you gotta follow up with that person 16 times. Like, I dunno about you, but like I , like there’s just no way that’s gonna happen. Yeah, I’m

John Jantsch (16:51): Getting the restraining order right now. Yeah,

Russ Ruffino (16:53): Of course. It’s like, dude, so 95% of our enrollments happen on that very first conversation and most of the time they booked that call within like 24 hours of clicking on our ad in the first place. So what I’m talking about is taking people who’ve never heard you, never heard of you before, they don’t follow you, they don’t know who you are, but they see your ad and your ad speaks directly to them. They click the ad, they watch your 20 minute video, 10 minute video, whatever it is, they book a call with you and then they’re enrolling in your high ticket programs within 24 to 48 hours.

John Jantsch (17:22): And I can, uh, that’s the exact approach you use in your own business as well. Cuz I’ve, you know, I went through your webinar and I, you know,

Russ Ruffino (17:28): Oh nice. Good follow up. Yeah, that’s good. And I see that, I see that more and more now, man. It’s like people will be like, oh yeah, you know, Facebook groups is the best way to get clients. And then, you know, you click on their ad and it doesn’t go to a Facebook group, it goes to a webinar. I’m like, what are we doing here? You know, like,

John Jantsch (17:43): Yeah. One thing that people might have missed is you skipped the, I hate these terms, but you skipped the trip wire and the low cost stuff and the, you know Yeah. Up to upsell to this crap and upsell to that crap. And you go right for if this is for you, here’s how you get it.

Russ Ruffino (17:57): Yeah. So there’s this myth that says that if someone buys something from you, even if they buy something for $5, then now they’re a buyer. And the buyer leads are worth so much more than any other leads. And that’s absolute nonsense because they’re not buyers, they’re $5 buyers. And a $5 buyer is not a $10,000 buyer necessarily. They might be, but you don’t know. What I’ve found, man, is that when you have a bunch of trip wires and low ticket offers and like, you know, you sell ’em some for $27 and then $97, and then there’s the 1 97 upsell and do all that stuff. What that does is alienate the people that really need your help, right? Because if your health is failing, your business is failing, your marriage is failing, you know damn well that $27 e-book is not gonna fix your marriage. You know what I mean? ,

(18:45): You’re like, bro, my wife hates me. There’s no way I’m buying this e-book and all of a sudden everything’s gonna be cool regardless of what the marketing copy says. And the sad thing is that usually the marketing copy is saying that’s what’s gonna happen. The, oh, you’re gonna buy this ebook, it’s gonna fix all your problems. And you know that’s not true. But when I come to you and I’m like, look man, we are gonna work together for real to fix this. I’m gonna work with you. I’m gonna hold your hand every step of the way. We’re gonna execute this game plan. I’m gonna be available to you to answer your questions to coach you through this entire process and it’s 10 K, but we’re really gonna get you the result. Now I have your attention, now you understand that this is something real. So what those low ticket offers do is they tend to attract the curious, but not the committed. The committed people see that $27 ebook and they’re like, yeah, whatever, I’m done, I I don’t need it.

John Jantsch (19:26): Yeah. Or worse they buy it and realize you can’t help them . Exactly. Because it’s like, this is garbage.

Russ Ruffino (19:31): When y’all eagle didn’t save my marriage, why would I give this guy 10 grand? You know?

John Jantsch (19:36): So what you’re describing, you know, this client attraction system, I mean, I know that you specialize in help people do group coaching programs, but mm-hmm. , let’s say I’m a, let’s say I’m a management consultant. Do you feel like this approach, you know, can work for somebody that’s doing, you know, high ticket, but sure, maybe one-on-one or not necessarily the coaching, traditional coaching industry.

Russ Ruffino (19:57): So how you deliver the outcome is basically irrelevant. You could do it in an eight week group coaching workshop. You could sell them a block of one-on-one mentoring sessions over the next six months. You could even get ’em into like a small event, like a 3, 4, 5 day retreat, something like that. So the way you choose to deliver the magic is really up to you. The only thing that matters to make it high ticket is it’s gotta be, it’s gotta be set up to give them the outcome. So if you can get them the outcome in a five day retreat, go for it. You know, if you can get them the outcome with one-on-one mentoring, it’s not my favorite, but go for it. It’s terms in terms of, as far as how you sell it, doesn’t matter as long as it’s all about the outcome.

John Jantsch (20:35): Yeah. The one-on-one mentoring better be really high ticket, right?

Russ Ruffino (20:38): Yeah. . Well, you

John Jantsch (20:40): Know what? There’s only so much, there’s only so much one

Russ Ruffino (20:43): . Well, so here’s the weird thing, man, is I’ve done both, right? So I’ve done one-on-one mentoring and I’ve done, I’ve also done like online group coaching and um, online group coaching gets way better results. And no one seems to believe that until they try it. Like, I didn’t believe it until I tried it. I was like, oh, you’re, you know, if you’re doing group programs, you know you’re lazy and you don’t care about your client results. And I was like, look, I’m gonna try this and I’m gonna see how it goes. But what’s really interesting is that what happens is this whole group dynamic is created where now the clients can support each other, cheerlead each other, answer each other’s questions, and you feel like you’re not like this lone soldier. So people get much better results in a group program than they do even with one-on-one coaching, which is amazing.

John Jantsch (21:20): And I’ve actually found that since the pandemic, people are hungrier than ever for that kind of cohort, small cohort stuff.

Russ Ruffino (21:26): Oh yeah. Because most of these big problems we’re talking about are very lonely problems. Like if you’re, if again, if your marriage is falling apart, it’s like you might not even wanna tell your best friend that, you know what I mean? Like you might, the people closest to you, it’s like nobody wants to admit that. Nobody wants to get into that. You know, if you’re 80, 90, a hundred pounds overweight, like it’s, it’s really hard to go to the people you love and have a conversation with that about, you know, but if I join this program and now there’s all these other people I don’t really know, but they’re in the same boat that I am now, I feel like I’m not alone and I feel like I have a community that can support me and help me.

John Jantsch (21:55): It’s kind of the stranger on a plane that, you know, you’ll tell ’em your life story. Right? So ro, tell people where they can, uh, find out more about the work that you’re doing at Client on Demand and just connect with you. I know you have a podcast as well.

Russ Ruffino (22:05): Yeah, sure. So we have a podcast if you wanna check that out, you can go to clients demand.fm. If you wanna check out just our homepage and what it’s like to work with us, you can go to clients on demand.com and then you can also find us on YouTube and Instagram and everywhere else. Probably the best place to go is clients on demand.com. Check out the presentation on that site and that’s gonna give you a really good introduction into what we do and how we can help you do the same thing.

John Jantsch (22:25): Awesome. Well, again, thanks for checking the time to stop by the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast and hopefully we’ll run into you soon, one of these days out there on the road.

Russ Ruffino (22:32): Thanks John.

John Jantsch (22:33): Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy strategy before Tex? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co, not.com, dot co. Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

Growing Your Audience (And Your Revenue) With A Book

Growing Your Audience (And Your Revenue) With A Book written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Matt Briel

In this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Matt Briel. Matt is an entrepreneur and the Vice President of Marketing & Communications at Lulu.com, as well as a self-diagnosed collaboration junkie. After more than 15 years leading Sales and Marketing teams in the Media & Publishing spaces, he’s developed a unique passion for helping creators become more successful by leveraging books as a catalyst for opportunities and sustainable revenue.

Key Takeaway:

Writing a book can take your credibility, authority, and your business to the next level – Not only does it you an amazing opportunity to share your knowledge, but it’ll also help increase awareness of yourself and what you have to offer. Matt Briel joins me in this episode and shares exactly how books can bring success for growing audiences, brands, reach, revenue, and more.

Questions I ask Matt Briel:

  • [1:29] Could you tell us about the origin story of Lulu and how did it come to be?
  • [2:25] Is self-publishing a more profitable way to publish today?
  • [5:12] Why would someone want to self-publish a book?
  • [7:30] Would you say self-publishing is seen as a differentiator for businesses?
  • [11:42] What does it take to produce a book?
  • [18:49] What do you say to that person that doesn’t think they have time to write a book?
  • [21:59] Where can people find out more about you and publishing a book with Lulu?

Learn More About Matt Briel and Lulu:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists, and it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts. Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast.

(00:50): This is John Jantsch. My guest today is Matt Briel, commonly described as equal parts, loud music, Disney culture, tattoos, and book nerd. Matt is an entrepreneur and vice president of marketing and communications @

Matt Briel (01:02): lulu.com, as well as a self-diagnosed collaboration junkie. After more than 15 years leading sales and marketing teams in the media and publishing spaces, he’s developed a unique passion for helping creators become more successful by leveraging books as a catalyst for opportunities and sustainable revenues. So, Matt, welcome to the

(01:22): Show. Thanks, John. It’s great to be here.

John Jantsch (01:24): So, so give me lulu.com, or Lulu is a self-publishing company. Give me a little bit of the origin story of Lulu and kind of how you came to it.

Matt Briel (01:33): Yeah, it’s actually a really fun one. We were founded by a gentleman named Bob Young, who was the original co-founder of Red Hat, which is a massive software company. Most of your listeners probably know what it is. Um, he and his partner took Red Hat to an IPO early days, and Bob found himself with a lot of time and a lot of money, and a lot of people wanted to hear his story. And so he wanted to publish a book. That journey through its ups and downs led him to basically create Lulu a place where anybody could publish and not face a lot of the barriers to entry Yeah. That people were facing to get their stories published, whether it be money or, you know, and you’re well aware of the gatekeepers at the publishing houses of traditional publishers. So that’s the quick and dirty of our origin story is that, and Bob Young, by the way, is still the sole owner and founder of the company, and very much and involved in what we do on a day-to-day basis.

John Jantsch (02:25): So I, I published my first book in, I think my first book came out in 2007. Boy, the industry has changed a ton in that period of time. But one of the things that I, well, let me ask you, rather than telling you what you’re gonna say, , you know, you think back in just even the last decade, self-publishing still had a little bit of, oh, you can’t get a real publisher. Right. And now I think it’s definitely through technology, through, you know, a lot of advances in opportunities. You know, I think it’s actually become not only a very valid way to publish, there certainly are people out there that have a large platform that see it as a more profitable way to publish.

Matt Briel (03:05): You’re absolutely right. What you’re referring to is the stigma that came with self-publishing. Right. And I, I think it’s even, you know, in the last five years, you don’t even have to go back a decade, but you’re absolutely right. So when Lulu started in 2002, so about 20 years ago, we just celebrated our 20th anniversary. Yeah. Self-publishing a book definitely got you at the bottom of the list of books that somebody was going to read or even take for free. And in many cases, that was warranted. I mean, let’s be honest here, but in a lot of cases it wasn’t, you know, it just, like we said, the manuscripts that are submitted still to this day, to traditional publishers, about 98 to 99% of them get rejected. So there’s a large buried entry. And that stigma has been present up until very recently, actually. And I think you’re right, you touched on the advent of technology surrounding publishing, as well as all the different things you can do now as a self-published author, as it relates to, you know, distribution channels. Right. And so, yeah, I think it’s having its heyday now, I think it’s finally become a very viable source of publishing and creating and printing books.

John Jantsch (04:09): Yeah, it’s interesting the distribution, because you know, even going back 15 years ago, it’s like the publishers had the wholesalers who had the retailers, and that was it. You didn’t get in that path, you weren’t getting in. And it’s really all opened up now to, obviously Amazon probably forced a lot of it, but it certainly opened up to it now where anybody, especially working with a, an organization like yours that’s established in the industry is, you know, gonna see their book in Barnes and Noble maybe if it warrants it.

Matt Briel (04:35): Yeah, that’s right. And again, for a lot of people, that’s what they were concerned with was distribution. Like, how is my book gonna get out there into the hands of everybody? And it was this, it was this thought process that a book is a very, you know, confined thing. It’s something that I wanna write it, I want it published, and I want it into the hands of people in bookstores around the world. There was really no sort of external or, you know, parallel thinking about what else could I do with this book and how else could I distribute it? So yeah, distribution was top of the list and for the longest time, you’re right, the best distribution methods were still at the hands of the traditional publishers who worked with the wholesalers. Yeah.

John Jantsch (05:12): So, so let’s talk a little bit about why somebody would self-publish a book. You know, I’ve experienced the benefits of it, but you know, I think a lot of people still are in that, like, I’m not really an author, or I don’t have that much to say, or, you know, I don’t think I could sell a lot of books. So let’s go into a little bit of the reasons, especially well for anybody frankly, but certainly for a business owner, why they would have, why they would publish a book, even with all of those sort of what they’re considering roadblocks.

Matt Briel (05:43): Yeah, absolutely. And that’s probably the number one thing we hear right now, or the question is, you know, why and who would do this? Yeah. Right. The answer I think surprises a lot of people when we talk about this. And I think self-publishing is most beneficial non-fiction creators and writers. Yeah. It’s most beneficial for businesses and institutions, educational or otherwise, that are using this for non-fiction utilitarian purposes. You know, if you look at our user base and our data alone, and we’ve got millions and millions of authors that have used us over the last 20 years, and we’ve published roughly, you know, couple hundred thousand books per year. The bulk of them are non-fiction, and they are utilitarian in concept. They’re handbooks, they’re manuals, they’re reference books, you know, they’re, they’re great books that are done through our platform that are all about coding Python or, you know, tax code laws in, in the northwest region of the United States. And so why

John Jantsch (06:40): You, so, so you should read those if you want to like, get to sleep at night, right? , but somebody finds them interesting, right, .

Matt Briel (06:45): Absolutely. I use some of them in the background to stack up bookshelves for myself here in the office. But yeah, I mean, why you would self-publish really blows down to your goals and your motives. And as a business, you know, a lot of your audience is small business owners or solopreneurs or early stage, you know, entrepreneurs. It’s, it’s such a great tool to use a book as a growth opportunity creator. And with self-publishing, especially now, like you alluded to earlier, with all of the tools and technology we have and what we’ve been able to build in our platform, it’s so easy. And so, yeah, why you would do it is because it creates new opportunities for you as a, as an individual, as an entrepreneur, as a business, or a brand, as an organization. And it’s just an easier way to get it done without having to deal with those gatekeepers, many of whom you’ll never get past.

John Jantsch (07:31): Well, and I think also, you know, I always tell people it’s a great differentiator, you know, if somebody is looking at, I don’t know, three marketing firms, for example, the one who’s got this book that tells a good story about, you know, how marketing’s actually how marketing actually works, even if the person doesn’t read it , it’s a differentiator. And that’s not, you know, based on, oh, you’re cheaper than the other guy, right?

Matt Briel (07:53): Absolutely. Yeah. The big sort of push right now, and a lot of what we use when we’re out at conferences or talking to people and even on interviews, is that books are the best business cards you could ever have. And aside from the revenue impact of having a book to sell, so many people we work with that are successful with them right now, they’re not using them for a source of revenue, or at least not a, it’s a passive stream of revenue for them, but they’re using it as an opportunity creator. And like you said, if you’re talking to two or three people who are consultants in the field of, you know, marketing or, you know, quantum physics, it doesn’t matter if one of those people, if she’s holding a book right, and says, listen, you know, I’m an expert in this. Here’s my book, take this, give it a look over and then, you know, call me if you have any questions. A, you’re not gonna throw that in the garbage. No animal throws a book away. Yeah. And B, that’s definitely gonna put you above. The other two are standing there with just a business card in their hand. And so the idea that you took the time to create a book and you have this information and this very sort of succinct package, you’re absolutely right. That’s a huge leg.

John Jantsch (08:55): I’ll tell you the other thing that I, I think a lot of people underestimate when they think about the time and frankly the monetary investment, you know, to get the thing off the ground. What I’ve found is the person with a book, especially a book, let’s face it, that does make some sense as well written , you get to charge a premium too. That’s right. I mean, you’ll make that money back. I can almost guarantee it. I know when I was already speaking professionally, because I’d been writing for a long time and, and I once, as soon as my book came out, and unfortunately it sold pretty well, but as soon as it came out I quadrupled my speaking fees. So , you know, really the time or whatever monetary investments you have, think it actually, that’s how you justify it, isn’t it?

Matt Briel (09:35): Yeah. And that’s a great point you just made too inadvertently, which was, you know, it’s really popular right now. People wanna get on the speaking circuits for whatever, you know, industry or vertical they’re in. Right? And you see it as well as I do, we’ve crossed paths already in the marketing circles. That’s a big thing to, to get a speaking gig at, you know, something like Inbound or one of these places. Yeah. Conferences, excuse me. And from what I’ve seen, and you can probably vouch for this, in most cases, you’re not even gonna get considered if you’re not, if you don’t have author next to your name, right? Yeah. If you’ve not published something, they don’t necessarily care that it was with McGraw Hill or self-published through, you know, Lulu or whoever. But if you’ve not taken the time to publish something on the topic by which you consider yourself an expert, you’re not even making the waiting list for a speaking engagement. And so for those who are trying to break into that scene, this is again, another way to really put yourself at the top of that list and it’s very inexpensive way. But like you said, even if you take the route of, you know, paying for some help to actually create a good book with some editors helping you and maybe a graphic designer on the cover, that’s still a relatively inexpensive investment in what you just said will be, you know, a very large career booster for yourself.

John Jantsch (10:45): Yeah. I’ve had any number of events reach out to me and said, yeah, our c e O picked up your book in the airport and, you know, thought we ought to really have you come speak at our event. I mean, they didn’t really, I’m sure they did some research, but you know, that was when they found me, right? . Yeah. So, so absolutely. Now from our sponsor, look, whether you have an established following or you’re just starting out, books are a great way for entrepreneurs and creators to establish credibility, grow an audience, and generate profit from landing more speaking gigs to ING leads for your business, to building a community of fans around your brand. A book can spark so many new growth opportunities for you. At lulu.com, they have free tools for publishing and e-commerce plugins for printing books directly from your website for turnkey white label fulfillment. Go check ’em out @ publishforgrowth.com to learn how to get started on your first or maybe your next book today.

(11:39): That’s publish for growth.com. So you hinted at this, so let’s go there. What does it take to produce a book? I think a lot of people think, oh, I just, you know, I type out 80,000 words, I give it to somebody, and while I’ve got a book, what is the real process in terms of putting out a quality book?

Matt Briel (11:55): Yeah. Second most asked question, we get . And so that’s the, also, the second thing that really hung people up for the longest time with self-publishing was it is a true do-it-yourself initiative if you want it to be. So, you know, in the days of traditional publishing, and I would imagine with you and many others that I’ve talked to along the way, you have a team, or your publisher has a team. So when you do your part, when you type your 50 to a hundred thousand words, you just hand that over to your agent or your contact at the publishing house, and then their team, they’ll go through it and tear it apart and do whatever they wanna do with it. Well, hopefully they don’t tear yours apart. But you know, when you’re self-publishing, you’re on the hook for all of that, right? And so what it takes to self-publish a book can be very easy and minimal, or you can make it as complicated as you want, but at the end of the day, you’re in control of all of that.

(12:44): And that’s one of the beauties of it. So what you need is content, you know, and depending on what you’re writing and what your goal for that is, it could be as little as, you know, 10,000 words, 8,000 words. The length and size of the book these days doesn’t necessarily matter as much as the quality of the content and what you’re gonna do with that book. So you need a PDF of that content, right? You need a platform. So if you were gonna use ours, you just create an account, you would upload that pdf, our system will scan it over and check for any errors in formatting or size. If it’s all good, you literally, you know, add the cover file, which you can either create on our platform, others have a similar tool, or if you’ve had your cover created by a graphic designer, which, you know, if you’re not good at it, which a lot of people aren’t, you can go to any number of freelancer sites like Fiber or 99 Designs, or your buddy who does graphic design on the side and hit the publish button and you’re good to go.

(13:37): You designate where you want your book to show up, you can designate it to be private access, meaning you only have access to it, to print copies for yourself. And then our greatest feature right now, and our biggest differentiator on what’s making the biggest waves is that you can now connect it to your own website and sell it directly and keep all the properties. So we work with, you know, Shopify and a WordPress plugins and a number of other ways to do that. So it is a lot easier than it ever has been. And depending on how, how concise and how well-crafted you want that book to be, it can go pretty quickly and inexpensively.

John Jantsch (14:13): I would toss in to the person that, you know, really wants something they can be proud of, that you probably should go out and on the private market look for a a, a true editor , as well as maybe a line editor copy editor. Because I just, from my experience, you know, a true editor has made my books better by saying, well just rearrange this here or tell more stories here. But then, you know, the lo the copy editor who you know, ends up chopping out about 2000 words of me just saying superfluous stuff and also making sure that I’m not using passive voice and I said this way and then this the way and the next one worth the investment. Certainly an additional investment. But I think to if you, if this is gonna be, you know, you’re that attorney and , you want people, you know, to read your book and show your professionalism, you know, it’s worth that investment. I think

Matt Briel (15:03): I would never disagree with that at all. Yeah. And again, if you’re gonna spend the money on any one area, that’s it. And we do also, there’s a spot on our website where we list resources, people, freelancers, editors, graphic designers who you can work with, because you’re right. I mean, if this is something that you’re gonna consider, you know, a growth tool and even potentially a legacy for yourself, right, right. Let’s face it, your books are a legacy, you know, you and many others who are putting these books out there, the last thing you want is some simple grammatical errors or some weird tone or voice that could have been easily rectified through, you know, less than a thousand dollars worth of editing work, you know? Yes. Yeah. So would agree with a hundred percent. John.

John Jantsch (15:40): So you mentioned the idea of selling direct, and I will say one of the cha challenges certainly with a traditional publisher is you have no idea who bought your book. And in fact, the publisher has no idea who bought your book. I’ve always felt in this day and age, that’s a giant gap because frankly, if I knew every single person that bought my book and I had a way to contact them, you know, the upsells, the, you know, the communities that you could build around that, the spinoffs that you could build just from having, you know, people who were engaged buyers of, it’s just like anything, I mean customers, but you don’t know who they are. . So, so now you, by selling direct, they are a customer and you know absolutely who they are. And I think that’s a benefit that you can turn your $14 book into, you know, 14, you know, million dollars, you know, worth of other products, isn’t it?

Matt Briel (16:32): You’re right. That’s the real game changer here too, especially for us. I mean, again, we’re one of the only ones that offer that ability right now. And when you look at the climate we’re in and the shift to online e-commerce over the past few years, or five years or so, and even, you know, with the onset of the pandemic and covid and this boon that’s happening in the creator economy and you know, a lot of the people listening to your podcast are solopreneurs and people who are going at it and really trying to make a living off of what they consider their craft or passion or whatever that might be. The ability to sell direct. Yes. Keeping a hundred percent of your profits is a benefit, of course. And for somebody like you, for example, if you’re selling, you know, thousands of books a month, right? Right. Imagine if you were keeping all of that versus you know, what the publisher is keeping. Yeah,

John Jantsch (17:15): No, I’m fine. I’m fine with 15%. It’s all right.

Matt Briel (17:18): , the real thing here is what you alluded to is customer data. And we’ve all been so conditioned over the years to just give that to Amazon or give that to, you know, whoever is the retailer of your product. For those of you listening that have a brick and mortar store, it’s a little bit different. But for the most part, everybody is really doing something online or utilizing a third party retailer and they’re keeping all of that customer data. It’s not your customer. And like you said, imagine if you had that customer data that you could remarket to and turn a $14 book sale into five years of book sales by remarketing to them and building that email list and owning all of that journey. And so that’s the real benefit that people are starting to discover and that’s really where this has been taking off for us and everybody involved in this.

John Jantsch (18:02): And I think that’s also, I mean you, you didn’t mention it necessarily, but building community, I mean, just knowing who those, I mean, even if it just started with a book club, you know, and you know, building relationship with that reader cuz they’ve already heard your voice, right? They’re, you’re in their head and so you know, you’ve got a real leg up in the trust game on doing that. Here’s the, really the last kind of big question and I’m sure you get it all the time. We’re talking about business professionals, they’ve, they maybe they’re founder, they’re running a company and it’s like, I got a day job , you know? Yeah. How am I gonna write all of this? You know, cuz I think they envision going off to the cabin and you know, for six weeks and Sling going, doing this

Matt Briel (18:37): And smoking a

John Jantsch (18:38): Bike. Exactly. So what do you say to that person that says, I don’t have the time to do this or you know, I don’t know when I’m gonna, you know, be able to create or I don’t even know what I would write. I mean, what do you say to that person?

Matt Briel (18:51): The answer is similar to some of the other things we’ve been talking about and it has to do with the onset of technology right now that is making our lives easier in every aspect of creating content and marketing and selling products, whatever it is you happen to be involved in. But the long and short of it is you have a couple of options for a lot of people listening, they already have content, they just don’t realize it. Right? For people listening to your podcasts that are bloggers or they’re podcasters or they have video blogs on YouTube or whatever that might be, there are so many cool ways where you could take existing content and repackage it, you know, chat transcripts from your podcasts. Uh, if you’re a blogger, take your top 10 most viewed blogs or red blogs and those are chapters now for a book or you know, there’s a lot of ways to repackage content that you already have.

(19:34): But if you’re truly starting from scratch and you’re saying, Hey, I’m trying to get this business or concept off the ground, or whatever that might be, it can be challenging. Of course nobody’s just gonna go off to a cabin in the woods and put their cardigan on and grab an old typewriter and crank out 80,000 words on a topic. But you have to chunk it up, you have to first start with an outline, it makes things the easiest and it keeps things in line and succinct and you know, sometimes just doing your outline could take you a month and that’s okay, but if you’re really putting that time and effort into it, the finished product is gonna be great. So get that outline started that serves as your roadmap, right? You would never get in the car and take off on a road trip without either, you know, maps on your phone telling you where to go or a paper map like you and I have probably used at some point in our life.

(20:18): Your outline is the same thing. So if you can get a succinct and out a well done outline done, you know, from there it gets easier. You just chunk it up and you’ve gotta create time for yourself. You literally have to put time on your calendar, even if it’s only 15, 20 minutes a day. Whatever you can get written in that time, you will see how quickly that stuff will start to add up and before you know it, you’ve got enough to send off to an editor you’re working with who’s gonna help you finish that product up. So it’s time management, like everybody listening to your podcast, you and I both we’re all challenged by it, especially these days. You’ve just gotta carve out the time to do it and the benefits in the end will definitely be worth what you’re sacrificing upfront.

John Jantsch (21:00): Yeah, and I think it’s, I think it’s key to get clear on those benefits, you know, what are you gonna gain from doing it? I always find that that, you know, helps people get the leverage over themselves in their time when they know, gosh, I gotta do this cuz the payoff is X. You know, one, one tip I’d throw in there too, I’ve worked with a lot of folks that they just feel like I’m just not a good writer or I’m, you know, I can’t get it down, but they can speak all day long and so , you know, create the audio version you know, of your book and let somebody turn it into the written word.

Matt Briel (21:28): Um, well that’s where technology comes in, right? There’s so many tools out there right now that you could literally just speak into your book and it will transcribe it for you. There are lots of other tools that will help you, you know, with the actual craft of writing. There are tools that will literally prompt you, Hey, it’s time to write your 500 words, you know what I mean? And guide you through it, so Yep, yep, yep. Technology’s our friend these days and it’s so inexpensive to free to use a lot of it.

John Jantsch (21:51): Yeah. So Matt, I appreciate you stopping by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast. You wanna tell people where they can find out more about publishing a book with Lulu?

Matt Briel (22:00): Absolutely. Thank you John. This has been good. You can find us@lulu.com. Very easy four letters. We’ve spent a lot of money competing with the Leggings company for URL traffic . You can also find us@publishforgrowth.com, which is a little more suited towards your audience and it helps you really understand, like we talked about those benefits of why you would publish something for your business. Um, so yeah.

John Jantsch (22:20): Awesome. Well, again, I appreciate you stopping by and hopefully we’ll run into each other one of these days out there on the road.

Matt Briel (22:26): We will, and thanks again, John, I appreciate it.

John Jantsch (22:28): Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co. dot co. Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network and Lulu.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

Whether you have an established following or you’re just starting out, books are a great way for entrepreneurs and creators to establish credibility, grow an audience, and generate profit. From landing more speaking gigs to generating leads for your business to building a community of fans around your brand, a book can spark so many new growth opportunities for you! At Lulu, we have free tools for publishing, and e-commerce plug-ins for printing books directly from your website for turn-key, white-label fulfillment. Meet us over at publishforgrowth.com to learn how to get started on your first (or next!) book today.

 

Uncovering The Hidden Power Of Your Unfair Advantage

Uncovering The Hidden Power Of Your Unfair Advantage written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba

Ash Ali & Hasan Kubba, guests on the Duct Tape Marketing PodcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba. They both are award-winning authors and entrepreneurs. Despite not going to university, Ash became a serial tech founder and the first marketing director of a unicorn startup – Just Eat). Hasan built a successful startup from his bedroom with nothing more than an online course and a yearning to escape the ‘rat race’. They are now international bestselling authors, coaches, and keynote speakers. Their latest book is – The Unfair Advantage: How You Already Have What It Takes to Succeed.

Key Takeaway:

Behind every story of success is an unfair advantage. Your unfair advantage is the element that gives you an edge over your competition. In this episode, I talk with Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba about how to identify your own unfair advantages and apply them to any project in your life. We talk about how to look at yourself and find the ingredients you didn’t realize you already had, to succeed in the cut-throat world of business.

Questions I ask Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba:

  • [1:44] The book starts out with the premise — life is fundamentally unfair.  Could you break that idea down?
  • [3:37] What you would call an unfair advantage that people tend to recognize?
  • [6:46] Would you characterize this book as a business book or a self-help book?
  • [9:43] What are some of the places that are less obvious unfair advantages that people don’t even realize they have?
  • [11:41] Some people are purely lucky, but I would say a lot of entrepreneurs have come to the realization that they make their own luck, and that’s something that is earned as opposed to something that’s an unfair advantage. How would you respond to that notion?
  • [13:52] What are your unfair advantages?
  • [19:13] What do you say to that person that feels that they don’t have an unfair advantage?
  • [22:57] Where can people find out more of the work that you’re doing and grab a copy of the book?

More About Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba:

Take The Marketing Assessment:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes, packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts.

(00:48): Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch, and my guest today is Ash Ali. And Hassan Kuba gonna have two guests today, their award-winning authors and entrepreneurs. And despite not going to University, Ash became a serial tech founder and the first marketing director of the Unicorn Startup Just Eat Hassan built a successful startup from his bedroom with nothing more than an online course and a yearning to escape the rat race. They’re now international best-selling authors, coaches and keynote speakers. And we’re gonna talk about their latest book, the Unfair Advantage, how You Already Have What It Takes to Succeed. So Ash and Hassan, welcome.

Hasan Kuba (01:32): Hello. Thank you. Thanks for having us.

John Jantsch (01:34): Hi. Awesome. So the book starts out with this premise, and we could probably do the whole show without me asking another question, but here it is. Life is fundamentally unfair. Who wants to take that dollop of hope?

Hasan Kuba (01:47): I’ll take it. I’ll take it going and so life is unfair. Yeah. That is the under underlying principle behind our book is that life is not fair. And sometimes when you get into self-development, like I did, and still I still enjoy a bit of self-development. Mo you know, you learned that you know, what you got in life is what you deserved. You know, you built the life that you’re living now. You designed it. Your decisions led to the moment you are in now and all these kinds of quotes and beliefs and mental models to make you take responsibility for your life, which is a very useful tool, but it’s limited because it’s not actually that accurate. So one of the ways to look at, well we talk about this in the book, is that it’s, it’s all about mental models. So there’s one extreme, which is to think that all success is based on hard work and, you know, merits.

(02:35): And the other extreme is to think it’s all luck and unearned. Mm-hmm. And the reality is squarely in the middle. Yeah. Right. There’s a lot of serendipity in life. There’s a lot of luck of births and genetic lotteries and there’s a lot of things that just happen because you were in the right place at the right time. Yeah. But at the same time, you can, you know, stack the deck in your favor. You can make the right decisions, you can be consistent in how you think, think and how you behave and the decisions you make to lead towards success. So it’s a mixture of both. Life is unfair and ultimately, you know, we’re so lucky and we should all be so grateful for everything that we have going for us. And at the same time, uh, we can also exert our own agency on the world. We can also take bear some responsibility. We can also take control of our lives to an extent.

John Jantsch (03:19): Yeah. Cuz it, it’s interesting. I mean, we all know people have had everything handed to them, all the funding, all the backing, all the mentors, all the, you know, whatever. And they’ve still found a way to piss it away, haven’t they? . So it really is kind of that combination.

Hasan Kuba (03:33): Exactly.

John Jantsch (03:34): So, so let’s maybe start out by defining, um, what an unfair maybe some examples of what you would call an unfair advantage that people tend to recognize.

Ash Ali (03:46): Yeah. So I mean, an unfair advantage is something that’s unique to you based on your circumstances and also based on your background and who you are as an individual. There’s so many books out there that talk about strengths, but what we do is talk about your strength, but also about yourself as an individual, as a unique person. So we talk about, you know, life is unfair and it’s not a level playing field, but sometimes when life is unfair and it’s not a level playing field, some people can grow up with a victim mindset and a victim type of thinking say, I didn’t have this, I didn’t have that. But actually what we say in the book is actually, how do you turn that around? How do you make that stuff that you, you felt was unfair growing up in poverty or growing up in an area that wasn’t great?

(04:26): How can you turn that around and make it part of your authentic story and use it to an advantage? So an example for me would be, I grew up with little money. And when I start companies now, and I know a lot of listeners are listening here who are run small businesses, when you don’t have a huge amount of money for marketing budgets, for example, I’m the perfect person to come in and work with you because I know how to be resourceful cause I had no money. Right? So my mindset is always based around being resourceful. That’s just an example of something that you could use, uh,

John Jantsch (04:53): Strip. But again, I, you know, to the flip side of that, I guess we all know people who had everything and should have made it. You know, there, we, we all probably know at least somebody, or at least you’ve read their story of somebody that sh never should have . You know, like you said, they didn’t have the education, they didn’t have the backing, they didn’t have the money. Yeah. They didn’t really have seemingly, you know, didn’t seem that smart, you know mm-hmm. , but, you know, they’ve, they’ve made themselves successful the way we defined that. So, you know, what are, you know, I guess to Hassan’s original point, it, it’s kind of somewhere in the middle, isn’t it?

Ash Ali (05:28): It is somewhere in the middle. It, it’s interesting because, you know, like I’ve got a daughter now who’s growing up in privilege and I look at her and I look at my life and think, okay, you know, does she have the fire in the belly? And what can we do to help her have the same mentality of working hard and trying to achieve things in life? And one of the things I found was that interestingly is that constraint does kind of foster creativity. And if you just live, give everything to your children, for example, straight away, then they’re not gonna, um, uh, feel grateful for it straight away. And unless they’ve worked for it. So con, sometimes having constraints, uh, does make you more resourceful and more creative. And that’s just an example of something we’re living in an abundant world now where everything is available quickly. You can audio your takeaway quickly, you can audio your cab quickly and you know, they’re growing up in a different environment compared to us where we had to wait for something, but we had to have some patience around something. So it’s understanding what constraint is and how to manage that, I suppose.

John Jantsch (06:24): Yeah. I I of course, it’s so cliche now, but you know, I like to tell even 30 year olds, you know, about uh, dial up, um, internet and, uh, . Yeah. Things of that nature. Can you, can you imagine that now, you know, it might take 10 minutes and we had to take turns, who could use it, right. Only one person could be on at a time and pretty crazy. So I think what would you classify or would you characterize this book as a business book or a self-help book?

Hasan Kuba (06:50): Yeah, good question. It really is in the middle because what we’ve done with our book is we’ve, so the origin of the book, let’s get into the origin. We did this book because we were getting pitched by loads of startup for funding and it was just like Shark Tank essentially. They’d come in and, and pitch us and we thought, what is the difference that makes a difference here? You know, when we confer between ourselves, we’re like, what is it with some people that we’re like, you know, even if we didn’t believe in them, they’re not gonna close out their funding ground. Nobody else is gonna believe in them and they’re gonna really struggle here. And what is that difference? And we start thinking about this and really diving into it and we decided to write this down, this idea of the unfair advantage. It’s essentially a sustainable competitive advantage for a big business.

(07:32): It’s kind of the type of thing Warren Buffet talks about in value investing. You want a business that has the economic modes, the defensibility that it’s gonna sustain. And it’s the same thing for individuals because at that early stage of a business, when you don’t yet have a product, even sometimes when you don’t yet have, um, customers, you don’t yet have traction in sales, how are you gonna judge it? Well, you’re gonna judge it by the team, by the co-founders. And when you’re judging it by the co-founders, that’s when you have to try and decide, okay, what have they got going for themselves? What do they have that’s gonna allow them to push through? Do they have a track record? Do they have something that gives you the idea that they’ll be able to get into this? Do they have the unfair advantages? Yeah. And essentially that was the idea behind the book. And that’s what made us think about like how we can help people to gain that kind of self-awareness. Yeah. To know what kind of business to go for, to know what kind of strategy to go for. Should you raise funding? Should you bootstrap? Who should you partner with? These are the kind of decisions we wanted to help people with at that early stage. So we’re just bringing it back to the individual. So that’s why it’s in between a business book and a self-development, cuz it’s about the early stages of a startup.

John Jantsch (08:40): Yeah. Are you an agency owner, consultant or coach that works with business owners? Then I want to talk to you about adding a new revenue stream to your business that will completely change how you work with clients. For the first time ever, you can license and use the Duct Tape Marketing system and methodology in your business through an upcoming three day virtual workshop. Give us three days and you’ll walk away with a complete system that changes how you think about your agency’s growth. The Duct Tape Marketing System is a turnkey set of processes for installing a marketing system that starts with strategy and moves to long-term retainer implementation engagements. We’ve developed a system by successfully working with thousands of businesses. Now you can bring it to your agency and benefit from all the tools, templates, systems and processes we’ve developed to find out when our next workshop is being held, visit dtm.world/workshop.

(09:37): That’s DTM world slash workshops. So I think there are some unfair advantages that, that are pretty obvious that people could identify. But if I’m out there listening, you know, what are some of the, what are just some of the places that you go looking, I know you have a framework you call the Miles framework. So we can kind of go, you know, letter by letter for the acronym. Uh, but, but what are some of the places maybe that are less obvious that you’ve said, Hey, you know, these are unfair advantages that people don’t even realize they have?

Ash Ali (10:06): Yeah. So the Miles framework is, uh, it stands for money, intelligence, location, and luck education and expertise and status. And it sits on top of mindset. And we talked earlier about why it’s important for people to understand the unfair advantage in the context of business. Because business is all about people. And most investors invest in small startups and early stage startups because of the people, not because of the idea itself. It’s the founders themselves. And so if you can identify your unfair advantages and then amplify those in your pitch, in your message to hiring people to your cust or getting customers, it will help you get your early traction, which is what starts a business. So coming back to the Miles framework, it’s about understanding within each one of those miles frameworks in the each one of those acri, the letters, what you have that’s going for you.

(10:56): Right? And one of the big ones is insight. For example, when you’re starting a company, right? If you have insight into something that nobody else has and you are starting a business around, that’s a very powerful unfair advantage. And there’s so many case studies in our book around that, um, about specific insights around that. Another one is being in the right place at the right time, right the location. And look, you know, if can you find the right co-founder? Can you find the right, um, uh, customers who are close to you potentially who can, who can become customers straightaway? Status is another one. You know, your network. And here, you know, when you are starting a business, if you know how to raise money quickly and you have a network, that’s an unfair advantage. And if you need to go out to the market to raise money from ground zero and have nobody, no network, it’s much harder to do. Much harder to do. Right? And we know how that’s how investment generally works. So there’s lots of little examples in different places for different types of projects or businesses. It depends where you wanna apply the framework itself, whether it’s a project, whether it’s your career, whether it’s, uh, a business itself.

John Jantsch (11:54): Yeah. Let me, I wanna come back to insight in a minute and have you share some examples, uh, to, to help clarify that one. But let’s talk about luck. Some people, some, some people are purely lucky. I mean, they run into luck, right place, right time, like you said. But I would say a lot of entrepreneurs have come to the realization that they make their own luck. And that, that that’s almost something that’s earned as opposed to something that’s an unfair advantage. How would you respond to that notion?

Hasan Kuba (12:23): I I totally believe in making your own luck as well. So we talk about luck and we talk about the fact that it’s overlooked and luck exists. Hey, luck does exist, talent does exist. You know, that all these books has become trendy to say there’s no such thing as talent. Just work super hard and get the 10,000 hours in and, and that will be, that’s enough. These things exist. Tiger Woods was like, could swing a, could swing, a golf could swing a club before he could walk . Like, like these are the kinds of things that that is like pure talent. Oprah Winfrey was like giving speeches to whole congregations at church when she was three years old making. So these things exist, but making your luck also definitely exists. Yeah. We talk in the book about how you can actually increase your luck. There have been psychologists who’ve studied the phenomenon of people who think of themselves as lucky versus people who don’t.

(13:10): And how the fact that they think of themselves as lucky just makes them more proactive, makes them more observant to opportunities that come up. And it’s been literally proven in studies. So it’s quite interesting that you can make your own luck. We say put yourself out there more. Yeah. Increase your surface area to luck and maybe more lucky things will happen. So it’s essentially like rolling the dice, just keep rolling it. No one’s counting how many you’re throwing the dice, how many times you’re throwing the dice. If you keep rolling, you’re more likely to roll the double six.

John Jantsch (13:37): Yeah, I actually, I started my blog in 2003 that I talk about being in the right place at the right time. That was luck to spot that technology. But also it, you know, it led to my first book four years later, but that point I had also written a thousand blog posts. So , you know, I always talk about really that was a lucky decision on my part to go that route. But then I, I do think, you know, you, you have to, you, you can also then turn that luck into something that is very fruitful.

Ash Ali (14:04): Yeah,

Hasan Kuba (14:04): Absolutely.

John Jantsch (14:06): So what’s your unfair advantages? Yeah, let, I’ll let you both answer that one. Go on. For example, as you mentioned, you didn’t go to college, so we’re,

Ash Ali (14:17): Okay,

John Jantsch (14:17): I’ll stop the college degree from Oxford off the table, right?

Ash Ali (14:21): . Yeah, that is, that can be an unfair advantage if you know how to use it. Some people don’t know how to use that as well. You know, we see people coming to us, Andre like, oh yeah, I went to caught Oxford in Cambridge or wherever. And it, it’s just, I’ll say it’s normal for them, but actually that could be an unfair advantage if you know how to use it properly. Uh, an unfair advantage, you know, there’s several different things with strength. There can be double-edged swords as we call them, right? So having something and not having something, and we talked about constraint earlier on, I’ll go through it from my perspective, which is kind of like the double-edged sword version of it. And it has someone go through it from his perspective. So from my perspective, I had no money growing up. So now when I’m building startups, I’m really shrewd and very lean and I can build things very quickly and I’m very resourceful.

(15:01): And, and actually what it does, has done to me is made me more creative. So one of my high skills is creativity, um, intelligence, um, and insight. I have lots of insights with businesses cause I’m doing things all the time. I’m always taking action. So I’m seeing opportunities and getting insights and different things and intelligence. There’s different types of intelligence. You know, a lot of people said to me, Ash, you’re really cool. Uh, you’re the glue amongst your friends. So I’m good at bringing people together and doing things together, which is cool. And I like to be, I don’t like to be the smartest person in the room, you know, I’d rather not be the most intelligent person in the room, but I can learn from other people quickly. So as well as that’s the, the eyesight location and luck. You know, I was born in Birmingham, which is like the second biggest city in the uk, an automotive retail industry kind of community.

(15:41): And the tech industry was booming in London. So I moved to London at the age of 19. If I didn’t move, I wouldn’t have had the same opportunities, wouldn’t have been able to join companies like just eat and do the I P O and look the IPO o you know, how many companies IPO O far and for few between it once again. And there’s a luck factor behind that and the right timing of that. And then seeing how that would work out. Education, I didn’t work university so I didn’t feel entitled, you know, so that, that’s what made, that’s why I kind of hit everything and anything. And I built my expertise up in Dear Tomar. So I was, and, and the time when everyone wanted to know how to do SEO and online marketing, I was there. And then status, you know, like, you know, and your Rolodex of contacts, you know, like I didn’t know many people, but now I know a lots of people. So if I need to do anything now, for example, I can open my black book of contacts, LinkedIn network connections and make things happen because of my status of having connections that are built up over time. Yeah. So that’s become an unfair advantage.

John Jantsch (16:31): What’s interesting, as you said, you know, the degree from a prestigious school used to really mean a lot. It feels like in the, particularly in the entrepreneurial space, it’s more about what were you doing for your summer job, , you know, than what degree you got or your side hustle or whatever seems to actually hold more weight than, than, you know, cost. And I think a lot of it’s because people realize college is great for making connections. What they teach in a lot of, like a marketing course in college will have very little application to what it’s like to market in the real world. And so that, you know, that education, the actual learning classroom education is probably not that valuable.

Ash Ali (17:09): Yeah, I, I mean if you want to learn, so,

John Jantsch (17:11): So Hassan, how

Ash Ali (17:13): Then the fastest way to learn is reading blogs like yours, John. And if you wanna learn about marketing, you can learn a lot more from reading blogs and marketing books can get old very quickly, right? What happened, you know, some time ago. Yeah, yeah. Timing wise might not work now. So it’s keeping fresh and uh, up to date with knowledge. I think that’s really important. And we talk about this in the book about this, there’s three aspects of university, but I’ll let Hassan talk about the Miles’s favorite from his side and what, what his advantages are.

Hasan Kuba (17:39): Yep. Yeah. So, so for me, look, so it is, it’s easier to simplify to what is your unfair advantage, but the reality is we’ll have a set of unfair advantages and a unique set of them. And that’s why Ash goes through so many, well, you know, for Ash, I would definitely say his creativity is, is just one of the top things about him. And the fact that he just gives things a go, he just goes for it. So for me, I would say that it’s my ability to learn really fast. So I think I have that kind of the intelligence where I pick things up fast and then I’m able to communicate them. So one thing that really helped me to get my initial clients and start to develop and get referrals is the ability to build rapport and build trust very quickly. So I think that’s partly just from my ability to absorb information and knowledge in the space that’s so new.

(18:25): And like something I was, one of the main things I was doing was seo. I was doing branding and websites stuff, but SEO and getting people to the top of Googles was huge. And so the fact that I was able to explain it to local businesses, build connections with them, build trust, I think that massively helped me. So that was huge for me. And then you can go further back and just say, listen, I was born in Baghdad, Iraq, and I came to the UK in London when I was three years old with my family to escape the war and all of that. So I’m, my unfair advantage is we moved to, to the UK when I was a baby and I grew up here in London. If you imagine if I’d come when I was 20 years old, I’d have the thickest accent and I’d have so much difficulty in terms of, it’s just how I come across the status side of it in terms of building rapport, building trust. So this is so lucky. So you can kind of go into the genetic lottery of it all. You can go into where you grew up and what kind of schools you went to. You can go into your ability to skill, skill stack and build your skills and expertise and learn things quickly. So I think that learning side is kind of the massive piece for me.

John Jantsch (19:27): So, so I suspect is you’ve both gone out there and maybe given talks on this or or web done webinars on this, that, that, you know, ultimately somebody comes to you and says, look, this is great, but I don’t have any unfair advantages, you know, what do you say to that person that that feels, especially since mindset really sits on top of this, what do you say to that person that, that has that mindset?

Hasan Kuba (19:52): So I would say that essentially this idea and ashes touched on it, this idea of double-edged swords, what you think is a disadvantage, you can turn into an advantage. And I’ll give you an easy one. So we have a few examples in the book of people who had a kind of a classic disadvantage. So a classic disadvantage is a woman entrepreneur, right? So a woman founder, the example of Sarah Blakely, founder of Spanx. Mm-hmm. . Now if you think about her, what was her unfair advantage? Okay, well it was tough. She had no idea about how to raise funding. Nobody would believe in her. She had no connections in that space, et cetera. But what did she have? She had an amazing insight into a problem based on her status as a woman, which is that this idea of like shape wear and, and spanks what turned out to be spanks, she would cut off the feet off tights.

(20:40): Like man wouldn’t have come up with that. wouldn’t have had that insight. The same with Tristan Walker, who’s another example in the book. He’s a, he grew up in the projects in, I think it was the Bronx maybe, or if I’m remembering correctly, Queens actually the queens in New York. And really poor, his dad was murdered when he was young. But hey, he was smart. He got scholarships, he got into good schools. He spent a long time thinking about what his big idea is. In the end, his insight was that black men need a different shaving system than other people do because they have more ingrown hairs. And so he developed this single blade shaving system. He used different rappers who also from his location, so the rapper Nas grew up also in Queens, and then he promoted his brand and then eventually he was acquired by Proctor and Gamble for 30 million.

(21:27): So it’s like what seems like a disadvantage you can use to your advantage if you grew up poor. Then you have an insight into how poor people live, what, what needs they have, what mass market products you might be able to create, let’s say. Or if you grew up as whatever, like you grew up from another country, or you’re learning languages or your, there’s all these different aspects to everything. So it’s all about your mindset. If you have a growth mindset, and we call, we talk about in the book the growth, uh, the reality growth mindset, because we wanna root it in some real reality, then you can grow and you can turn what seems like a disadvantage into an advantage. And listen, if you’re listening to this podcast, if you’re able to read this book, you probably have a lot to be grateful for. So you just need to kind of do a sort of an audit. And gratitude is one of the underlying themes of our book.

John Jantsch (22:13): Yeah. And it’s interesting too because as we grow up a lot of the things that drive our parents or teachers crazy, you know, ultimately come out as an advantage, you know, we were told they were a negative. For example, I, you know, I, my parents used to always joke about how curious I was and always getting into things because I had an teacher, same thing. You know, I was told for a long time that that was a problem that has served me extremely well in my professional life. And I think that’s, uh, sometimes we just have to overcome, you know, the, what, what society has told us is a negative, don’t we?

Ash Ali (22:43): Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. When people focus on your weaknesses more than your strengths, that’s when you start to misunderstand really what your unfair advantage is. Because we’ve all got strengths. And what we, the idea of the premise for the book is to double down on your strengths rather than focus too much on your weaknesses and then plug those gaps where you can appropriately and understand that we work in teams and people. It’s about businesses, about people. So it’s not just about you as an individual.

John Jantsch (23:09): Yeah. So, so Ash, uh, Hassan, where, tell people where they can find more of you, more of the work you’re doing, and obviously a grab a copy of the unfair advantage.

Hasan Kuba (23:19): Yeah. We’re all, all, all over social media. So I’m at Startup Hassan. Uh, Hassan is spelled with one s and Ash is, is it Ash Ali, uk Ash, for most of your socials you can find us and our website is the unfair academy.com.

John Jantsch (23:33): Awesome. And the book is, will be available in, I, I don’t believe there’s an audio version. Is there? There

Hasan Kuba (23:39): There

John Jantsch (23:39): Is, yeah, there is. Okay. So an audio and then, uh, in e ebook format as well as, uh, hard cover and available. Mm-hmm. depend upon when you’re listening to this available everywhere that you buy books.

Hasan Kuba (23:50): Yeah, it’s available now cuz it’s at the time of recording. It’ll be released tomorrow. So it’ll be available by time comes,

John Jantsch (23:56): And I should have mentioned this, but the book has been awarded. I don’t have it written here. Tell me the best business book in the UK in 2021 or something. You can do it better than I just did. Tell me, tell me what the award was.

Hasan Kuba (24:08): . So, so we were surprised and happy to learn that we’d won our category of the startup category of the business book awards. Yeah. And then it was like 12 different categories and then it turned out we’d won the whole thing as well over all the categories. So we’d won the business book of the year 2021. It was actually, it’s based in the uk but it’s an international award as well. The only country that the book hasn’t come out yet until now is in the US and Canada in North America. So yeah, it’s done really well. It’s really popular on Good Reads, it’s on YouTube, it a lot viral videos on YouTube’s took, summarizing it. So if you want to check it out a bit further, you can see some summaries on YouTube, you can read all the reviews. It’s, it’s doing, it’s thankfully spreading by word of mouth cause people are loving it.

John Jantsch (24:53): Yeah. Awesome. Well thanks so much for stopping by the the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast and hopefully we’ll run into you both, somewhere out there on the road.

Hasan Kuba (25:00): Thank you John. Thank you John. And big fans of Duct Tape Marketing, by the way, .

John Jantsch (25:03): Appreciate that. Thanks so much. Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co. Co check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

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What Employer Branding Is And How To Build It For Your Business

What Employer Branding Is And How To Build It For Your Business written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with James Ellis

James Ellis, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing podcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview James Ellis. James. James is the principal of Employer Brand Labs in Chicago and is a born employer branding nerd whose mission is to create a million employer brand thinkers. He is an author, keynote speaker, practitioner, and podcaster with a wealth of experience across multiple industries for almost a decade.

Key Takeaway:

No matter the size of your company, you can use an employer brand to your advantage. With it, not only could you be seen as a desirable place for great talent but also gain serious business outcomes – like reducing recruitment costs and shortening search times! In this episode, James Ellis shares his insights on what exactly an employer brand means and how it’s possible to make the most out of yours.

Questions I ask James Ellis:

  • [1:20] What is employer branding and why does it matter?
  • [2:29] Would you go as far as to say a primary marketing message talking about what a great team you have and how great people like to work there, is really not a bad attraction message for customers either is it?
  • [4:46] How does somebody need to start thinking about creating and communicating a positive employer brand?
  • [7:38] Culture and employer branding are the same in a lot of ways – would you say one is just the communication of it in an outward way?
  • [11:46] How do you measure employer branding and what is the ROI?
  • [13:39] Should employer branding be in the marketing department? And how are companies wrestling with marrying marketing, recruiting, and overall branding?
  • [15:50] There are plenty of surveys out there that show that people will take far less money to work in a place that focuses on creating a great ROI – would you ever use that type of argument to get the ROI and practical nature of this?
  • [18:50] I tell people all of the time you have to have a narrow focus on who’s an ideal client, and that means you have to tell some people they’re not an ideal client. Would you suggest to some degree that as a company the same idea applies?
  • [21:06] What has virtual remote work from home done to this dynamic?
  • [23:19] Where can more people connect with you and find out more about your work?

More About James Ellis:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes, packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts. Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch. My guest today is James Ellis. He’s a principal of Employer Brand Labs in Chicago, is a born employer branding nerd whose mission is to create a million employer brand thinkers. He’s an author of keynote speaker, practitioner, and podcaster with a wealth of experience across multiple industries for almost a decade. We’re gonna talk about, you guessed it, employee branding, employer branding. James, welcome to the show.

James Ellis (01:18): Thanks so much for having me, John. I’m thrilled to be here. So

John Jantsch (01:21): This is one of those topics that we probably shouldn’t have to, but we better start with what is in fact employer branding, and then we can go into why it matters.

James Ellis (01:29): No, I honestly, the employer brand has been long run long enough, but it’s still vaguely understood that I watched lots of people try and sell it. And I’m like, until you define it, that’s why I feel like you’re just grabbing me by the ankles and trying to shake the change outta my pocket. Classic if such a thing could be said, the classic definition employer brand is it is the individual perception, meaning it’s in your head. It’s in my head. But they’re different of what is it like to work at Company X based on touchpoints and experiences, some of which happened before the recruiting and job search process. Some of happens during and some happens after. So it is that individual perceptions. So what I think it’s like to work at Nike and what you think it’s like to work at Nike are, can be different, but they can both be. Right. And so influencing those perceptions is the job of employer brand

John Jantsch (02:15): In, let’s just go right into marketing, cuz that’s all I know. the, you know, when you think about it, uh, people wrestle to differentiate themselves with a marketing message, right? And quite often it’s about our thing does this, or, you know, here are the benefits. But would you go as far as saying that as a primary marketing message, talking about what a great team you have, what great people , how great people like to work. There is really not a bad attraction message for customers either, is it?

James Ellis (02:44): I don’t know. So if I go to a, if I pick a flight, they’re all Boeing through air buses. They’re all working the same routes. They’re all working. I mean, they’re all flying outta O’Hare. So what’s the difference? Well, gosh, the only difference is the people working there. So the difference between a delta and a, a frontier and a united is the almost exclusively a function of the people working there. So if you choose a certain kind of person they embody, they are owning that sense of what it’s like to work here. And that creates the experience of what it’s like to be a customer on that side. Now, airlines are an obvious example, but it’s true. The, any company you work at or any company you’re a consumer at, it’s good to know who works there. It’s good to know that they’re friendly faces, that they’re happy, that they’re, you think they do better work, you think they’re delivering a better product, right?

(03:29): Right. There is an inter intersection for the longest time employer brand has lived over in this, what I will lovingly refer to as the recruiting and talent acquisition ghetto. It’s the way of saying, Hey, let’s write a better job posting, or, Hey, let’s make some Glassdoor scores better. What employer brand is, when you really get down to it, it’s the human face of the marketing side. Marketing’s gonna talk about products, it’s gonna talk about features, it’s gonna talk about position, you know, your classic five Ps, four Ps, however you learned it, right? But nobody talks about the people. That’s the sixth p. And if employer brand can kind of own and drive that message and say, look, yes, it’s a great product. Yes, it’s gonna solve your problems and aren’t these wonderful people who make it, it just further reinforces why someone should

John Jantsch (04:09): Buy it. I tell people it’s, it’s how people actually, it’s how customers and prospects are experiencing your brand or company. Yeah. Because that’s, it’s, you know, the person answers the phone, greets ’em at the door, you know, sells ’em something. I mean, that’s their perception of the company.

James Ellis (04:24): Yeah. Target thinks that what it sells is products at a low price. What it really sells is a decent experience of that where I don’t feel bad about myself because those people seem like they’re happy wearing those red shirts and they’re doing their thing. Like, okay, great. I feel better about it than I would and say another company where it just feels like everybody’s, oh, this is the drudgery job.

John Jantsch (04:42): Yeah. All right. So now we’ve brought complete clarity to what it is. So let’s talk about how somebody, like what are the components of, what are the mechanics? Like, how does somebody need to start thinking about creating, but then also communicating in a positive employer brand?

James Ellis (04:58): Yeah. Employer brand has two sides of the same coin. It is that definition, that distillation of what is this brand? What is the message we’re going to market with? But it’s also the ongoing seemingly perpetual means of activating and localizing that brand. So to build a brand, my model is there are four kind of legs of the stool. There is what is the stand or the actual experience of a employee working there, right? Mm-hmm. not what I want to be true, but what do they say, right? Yeah. Two is what is the leadership saying and where is the company going? You know? Right. They have a sense that leadership’s job is something future facing. So where is the company going? Three, what is an employee want in a job? Right? Some people want stability, some people want status. Some people want big old sacks of cash.

(05:42): Everybody’s motivated by different things. So what does your audience actually care about? And then what is the relative competitive set, right? Yeah. If you’re talking, if you’re trying to hire a product manager and a product manager can work almost anywhere, well, gosh, they have a different kind of, you know, set of competitors than say, a nurse who’s only gonna work in a hospital, a clinic, or a doctor’s office. So understanding those four things brings your employer brand into pretty clear clarity, right? There’s a little creative work that happens to kind of distill it and kind of put a bow on it to make it like, oh wait, that’s really tight. But those are the four ideas that you have to wrestle with.

John Jantsch (06:16): Well, you make a great point too about the competitiveness of the industry too. I mean, a lot of times people will think, oh, our industry is so competitive, we gotta have that extra edge, right? But where I like to go is, okay, the remodeling industry or the tree service industry, right? This is a huge edge , right? Mm-hmm. To stand out, because anybody who comes into always like to pick on home services, anybody who’s coming into my home, the exper, I kind of figured they got wrenches, they got trucks, they can do the work, but the experience is the huge factor for

James Ellis (06:48): Me. Yeah, yeah. The plumber you hire, they all have the same wrenches, they all have the same hammers. It’s what you do and how you do it that really makes that experience real.

John Jantsch (06:57): Yeah. And I, you know, I’m probably hypersensitive, you know, like I’m going with companies because I like their follow up process, you know? I mean, it’s like, yeah, they get it if they’re doing that thing, right, , you know, they’re probably gonna do the other stuff, right, too, maybe. Why? Exactly.

James Ellis (07:08): But there, there’s a swing in like, you know, if you’ve talked to B2B marketers, it’s always about, it’s not b2b, it’s p2p, it’s person to person. Yeah. Consumer marketing has not quite got that message that it’s a person buying and it’s a person selling, and they need to adopt some of those lessons as

John Jantsch (07:22): Well. Yeah. Just go read the reviews on every plumber. It’s Russ, rusty fixed my boiler. He was amazing. They don’t even mention the company, right? It’s the person that came in.

James Ellis (07:30): Yeah, we just did our kitchen and this guy lived in my house for three weeks. I mean, it’s like this. They lived here. So yeah, I, it’s the experience of the human.

John Jantsch (07:37): Yeah. So let’s use the culture word then, because you know, all of the employer branding initiatives in the world are not really going to move the needle if people don’t think it’s a great place to work, right? I mean, so yeah, how do you, I mean, they’re really one and the same in a lot of ways. One is maybe just the communication of in an outward way, right?

James Ellis (07:59): Yeah. I always kind of get weirded out when this conversation starts because everybody kinda goes, oh, well I know what brand is, I know what culture is, and therefore I’m equating the two. It’s like, yeah, in a shorthand that works. Yeah. But the truth is, I’m a big believer that there’s a lid for every pot that the company that I wanna work with and I would adore working with, is not the company you wanna work with. And that’s not, I’m good, you’re a bad, or vice versa. It’s simply what we want is different than as humans. That’s completely natural. We look at, you know, use the stories that come out. Goldman Sachs, they’re working their junior analysts to a hundred hours a week, and oh my God, the calamity. And even inside my industry was like, oh, this is gonna really impact their employer brand, and it won’t.

(08:37): Because the truth is every single person hired for that job knew the workload that they were taking on, but they also knew the reward of taking that workload on. They made a conscious and very informed choice to do that thing, right? You’re gonna take my twenties, I’m never gonna see my parents for 12 years. That’s fine, because I’m never gonna see the inside of a coach cabin on an airplane ever again. Right? That’s the trade off you’re making now for someone working at state government, that sounds hellacious, but their motivations are completely different. They love the idea that at five o’clock they close their laptop, and I’m done for the day. I can go do this other thing and have this life. They’re motivated by different things. Is one job better than another? No, and that’s the problem. Everybody is really focused on this very linear sense of good versus bad, right?

(09:22): Glassdoor has said, this is your score, and therefore that is your employee brand. We’ve heard things like, this is your culture, therefore that’s your employee brand. It focuses too linearly In the end, you might want status, you might want opportunity, you might want op autonomy, you might want, there’s like nine core human motivations that move us to pick a job. The problem is, candidates don’t realize that they are o motivated by that. But two companies need to understand that this is, they care about who they bring in and the motivations they have. If you are a company of sharks where com competition and backstabbing and win at any cost is the norm, they should be crystal clear about that so that the accidental sheep doesn’t wander in and get murdered in the, you know, feel the sharks. And I know I’m cross-referencing land and and sea animals here, but

John Jantsch (10:07): There’s a lot of mixed metaphors

James Ellis (10:08): Going on yet. That’s right. That sounds like what I do. . But the opposite is true, right? If you’re a company where collaboration and best idea wins and supporting one another, how you want to do business, hiring a shark is just a horrible idea. So there is a lid, furry pot. The job is to communicate what does that mean in a way that’s meaningful and credible.

John Jantsch (10:26): You know, that’s a really great point because I think some people, rather than owning who they are, actually try to say, no, here’s who we should be. And that’s, you know, regardless of what you’re doing, , that’s a recipe for disaster, isn’t

James Ellis (10:37): It? Yeah. You see these lists of these are the best places to work, and you’re like, oh, we’re just like that. Like, no, you’re not. Otherwise you’d be on that list, wouldn’t you? But okay, that’s neither here

John Jantsch (10:45): Nor there. Are you an agency owner, consultant or coach that works with business owners? Then I want to talk to you about adding a new revenue stream to your business that will completely change how you work with clients. For the first time ever, you can license and use the Duct Tape marketing system and methodology in your business through an upcoming three day virtual workshop. Give us three days and you’ll walk away with a complete system that changes how you think about your agency’s growth. The Duct Tape Marketing System is a turnkey set of processes for installing a marketing system that starts with strategy and moves to long-term retainer implementation engagements. We’ve developed a system by successfully working with thousands of businesses. Now you can bring it to your agency and benefit from all the tools, templates, systems, and processes we’ve developed to find out when our next workshop is being held, visit dtm.world/workshop. That’s DTM world slash workshop. All right, so now I’m the boss, and James has come to sell me on this idea of employer branding. And so I’m going, going to say, how do I measure this? What’s C R o? Roi, right?

James Ellis (11:57): That is,

John Jantsch (11:58): I’m the first person that’s ever asked you

James Ellis (12:00): That. Yeah, that’s true. True. You, congratulations, you’ve invented that question. The problem is, it’s the wrong question. You don’t really ask classic branders that what you say is, can you focus our message so that it resonates and connects with the right audience? If you’re selling planes, you’re not like, does my mom know? Does my mom wanna buy our planes? That’s probably not a likely audience for you. However, our CEOs wanting to buy your planes. Okay, that’s really interesting. Will they buy your planes? Well, that’s a salesperson’s job. So branding it as a measurement function is really hard to do. What I would say is that when you’re thinking about employer brand, what you’re really trying to do is make the right people want to work for you. It’s not about more applications, it’s not about volume. And here is where I get into trouble talking to an actual marketer, marketing, and I say this non pejoratively, very positively.

(12:47): Marketing worships at the temple of more, they want more eyeballs and more shelf space and more wallet space and more impressions. And more and more, everything is a function of more employer brand is probably the only aspect of marketing where quality is better than quantity. And I say that and every marketer goes, I like quality too. You’re like, in the end, I have the one job and I can only give it to one person. So my job isn’t to give it to a hundred people. My job is to give it to the best person. That is how I measure. And so really good employer brands should be measured on quality. Are you attracting better quality talent? Are you attracting more people who are potential award winners, or the people who are gonna be the rock stars of your industry? If you are employer branding is doing that job, getting a million people to apply for your job is how you get fired, right? You sell a million, anything you’re gonna get employee of the month, you get a million applicants, you’re getting fired

John Jantsch (13:38): . So how does somebody, you know, we talked off air a little bit, like should this be in the marketing department? Is it in hr? You know, there’s no question that recruiting anybody, you know, showcasing how your company is different. I mean, those are marketing functions, but so, so how are companies wrestling with this aspect, which maybe is, well not maybe has always been there, but now has kind of got a bright light on it and marrying those into like, well, here’s what our overall brand is as well.

James Ellis (14:09): Yeah. Most companies start employer brand as kind of a pilot project. And it’s usually sitting in the recruiting side, Hey, we gotta, why don’t we have an Instagram channel? Hey, why don’t we put some content on LinkedIn? Hey, let’s make a video. Right? They have that pilot, right? Right. They start it, they kind of go, oh, this worked. What if we got serious about it? And they have a pretty clear maturity model of how this works, right? They specify and they get specialists who write caught it and build videos and all that stuff. And we build advocacy who integrate it throughout the entire company. The ideal of all this, the goal of the platonic ideal of what employer brand should be is that the company has one brand. And that, yeah, it’s a lens through which consumers look through or consumer marketing looks through through it to talk to consumers.

(14:52): Investor relations looks through it to talk to their investors. And employer brand looks to see what the candidates want. And so it’s the same brand. And when you see it as a single brand, one, the conversation of where should it live kind of gets a little, it doesn’t really matter. You know, we all have a, you know, if we’re all looking at the same thing, it really makes things easier. But once you’re all looking at that same lens, the work employer brand does, makes consumer marketing better. The work consumer marketing does, makes employer brand better, and therefore they should be integrated. They should talk to each other. Do they need to live side by side? Ah, equivalent on that.

John Jantsch (15:27): So when you talked about attracting talent, there are plenty of surveys, at least that I’ve read, that talk about people. People will, you know, take far less money to work in a place that they’re happy to, you know, work in a place that probably does focus on creating a great employer brand. So would you ever use that type of argument to get the roi, to get these sort of practical nature of this?

James Ellis (15:50): There’s plenty of evidence and research that shows a bad brand. You have to pay a premium to bring in talent that matters. Yeah. That is just, you know, no one wants to work at Bob’s filling house of whatever. You gotta pay 20, 30, 50% more to get that person to even consider you because it’s added risk to them, right? That logo is now on their resume forever. And so that’s a burden, huh? At the same time, I know incredibly smart and talented people who teach, I know incredibly smart and talented people who work at nonprofits who’ve made a very clear decision to say, look, I’ll lose 20, 30% of my income because I’m doing a thing that matters to me. Yeah. So when we think about the phrase evp, everybody forgets the wor middle word, which is value. So what do people value? Okay, yeah.

(16:29): Everybody likes money. Let’s be fair. It’s America. It’s wherever you are. Capitalism works. It’s o not the only conversation, right? If you have to, if you’re, are you choosing Goldman Sachs or you’re working a hundred to 110 hours a week where you’re making all this money, that’s a value transaction. People choose to say, I’m gonna have work 40, 50 hours a week to get this kind of work-life balance. Some people will burn themselves out working for a mission that matters to them, right? Yeah. You look at everybody who works at SpaceX, they’re not there because the management style is so great. They’re there cuz they’re trying to go to Mars and what other companies go into Mars. If that’s what you care about, that’s where you go. It’s the end of that list. So getting a better sense of what is my value offering is really where the conversation happens.

(17:11): The problem is, in most recruiting and candidate experiences, when you think about being a candidate, you hear, oh, we’re a great company, we’re very innovative, we do this, we have this, we do. You get all these claims, and I love talking to marketers cause I can use the word claims with, and you get what I’m saying. Recruiters go, Hey, wait a second, I meant that. But you get all these claims and you’re like, that’s great, but none of them are provable. They’re all completely subjective saying, you are very innovative, it’s easy to do, right? I just did it, but when I show up and you give me a four year old Dell laptop and say, this is your computer from now on, I’m like, whoa, time out. What happened? Innovative. Well I meant this. And suddenly you understand how, how subjective, it’s, so if you look at the entire experience of getting a job, you realize there’s only a handful of non-subjective points being made.

(17:56): And the most important one is salary. Because if you say you’re gonna make a hundred thousand dollars and that you hire that person and you pay them 90,000, that’s called fraud. In fact, it’s technical felony fraud, and people go to jail for that stuff. And you don’t wanna do that. Saying you’re innovative is just some BS you just get to spit out. So in recruiting, the job is to say, if you focus on a non-objective value, if you focus on the subjective value, we have status work, left balance, innovation, autonomy, whatever it is, my rule of thumb is you have to prove it 10 times harder than an objective value. Right? The objective value being, Hey, what’s my title? Hey, what’s my start date? What’s the bonus structure? When do I get a review? That’s pretty hard and fast saying, this is a great place for families to work. Anybody can say that you gotta work real hard for me to go, oh, you, I, that’s true. That must be true. And that’s where the value conversation needs to happen.

John Jantsch (18:50): Yeah. That that’s where, you know, repeated stories demonstrate . That value has really kind of come to play. You know, one point that you made that, you know, as marketers, I’m constantly telling people, you got a narrow focus on who’s an ideal client, and that means you have to tell some people they’re not. Yes. An ideal client. And I think I, I think the same probably holds true here to a degree that you know, if you are X, Y, Z, or if you are looking for X, Y, and Z we’re probably not the place for you. Would you suggest people could go that far?

James Ellis (19:16): Ab No, actually there’s that. That’s a complete tenant of what employer brand is. Your job is not attractive to everybody. In fact, if you really looked at it, you only need to hire, let’s pretend you’re a good concise company. You only need to hire about a thousand people at most. You need to get a hundred thousand people to be really interested enough to work for you that they apply. Okay, a hundred thousand people relative to 8 billion people on the planet. That’s a really low percentage, which means you really only need to be engaging and interesting to 0.001% of all the audience you could be talking to. And once you realize that, you start to go, okay, so I don’t need to make these grand claims that we’re a world beating company, that we’re the greatest company, that we offer the best in class, blah, blah, blah.

(19:57): But I realize who I’m trying to reach. And that means I can start to understand what they care about and suddenly I can put messages out that only they care about, right? If I’m trying to hire working mothers. And that’s a really broad spectrum, but at the same time, I don’t know any companies who say we’re trying to hire working mothers because they are really good at kind of balancing work life. They’re really good at getting things done, they’re really good at managing expectations. They’re really good at talking to customers. There’s a whole narrative about this particular audience would be great for us. So in order to attract, then you have to talk about the things they care about in the way they care about them. So you talk about mother’s rooms, you talk about leave, you talk about balance, you talk about education spending, you talk about all this stuff that a non-working mother might not care about, but you don’t care. You’re trying to focus on this audience. The more you specify and the more you segment, the more specific you can get can get about what they care about. And suddenly you’re not just any company talking, which is every company, but you’re a very interesting company because you’re speaking their particular language.

John Jantsch (20:56): Yeah. So key there is understand what that language is. Well absolutely. I’m getting tired of asking this question, but you know, especially anytime that it comes to people conversations, what has virtual remote work from home done to this dynamic?

James Ellis (21:10): Well, first off, it’s, it just, it changes the math, right? It used to be, well, I’m a hospital or I’m a small startup and I’m in Chicago. You draw a circle on the map, those are the people I can hire. It’s real simple. But suddenly that circle got, went, got erased where it has holes in it. Certainly even companies who I’ve engaged with, where they’re very focused on, you have to come in the last three years, they’ve really said, okay, there’s talent out there that we normally wouldn’t say yes to, but let’s have a conversation. And having to deal with that kind of model and realizing that good talent can bring in good quality work, even if they’re a thousand miles away, has changed the conversation internally in leadership. I know there’s a push to say, let’s bring ’em in, let’s bring ’em in, let’s bring ’em in.

(21:52): That’s a reaction. That is a mm-hmm jean jerk reaction to say, I liked it the way it used to be. I understood that world. Let’s go back there. But I’m pretty sure that’s not how change usually works. It usually just keeps going forward. So this is a, just from a math point of view, it matters at the same time just saying we are a fully in-house work environment. We are a fully hybrid work environment. We are a zero. We are a fully remote work environment that plants massive flags to people saying this is, it shapes their perception of what it’s like to work there. You look at an automatic where there’re completely remote work, there is no office make, make your own office that says volumes about what it’s like to work there relative to a bank that says, no, no, a hundred percent everybody shows up.

(22:38): You wear a suit, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. That says a lot. Does it say all of it? Absolutely not. But it does frame the conversation. And what goes back to that sense of competition. If you’re trying to hire a developer and you’re a bank, you have to know that developer is also looking at automatic going, I could work at a fully remote wear, wear my pajamas every single day, do amazing work at midnight kind of thing. Or I have to go to this bank and dress up in a suit and what’s a tie? What that, I sounds like a word, but I don’t know what that word is. Like that you have to explain why that’s good for them. And that kind of focus really changes the math on who you talk to, what you talk about and what they care about.

John Jantsch (23:16): Speaking with James Ellis about employer branding, James, do you want to invite people to connect with you somewhere or find out more about your work?

James Ellis (23:23): Absolutely. You can find me employer brand labs.com, but really I run a, oh, a newsletter. It’s free, it’s really designed, you know, you mentioned my mission of getting a million employer brand thinkers, right? This is how I’m trying to get recruiters, marketers, HR VPs to say, oh, there’s a heart of employer brand that I can use and I can leverage. And that’s where I would invite them to go. So you go to employer brand headlines.dot com or just Google employer brand Headlights. It’s a free newsletter. I, it’s a lot of great content every single week.

John Jantsch (23:49): Awesome. Well, again, thanks for taking a moment to stop by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast and uh, hopefully we will run into you soon, one of these days out there on the road.

James Ellis (23:56): Thanks so much, John. This has been great.

John Jantsch (23:58): Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co. Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

How To Build A Business That Builds Leaders

How To Build A Business That Builds Leaders written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Robert Glazer

Robert Glazer, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing podcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Robert Glazer. Robert is the Founder and Chairman of the Board of Acceleration Partners, a global partner marketing agency, and the recipient of numerous industry and company culture awards, including Glassdoor’s Employees’ Choice Awards two years in a row. He is the author of the inspirational newsletter Friday Forward, the #1 Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and the international bestselling author of five books: Elevate and Friday Forward. His latest book is – Elevate Your Team: Empower Your Team To Reach Their Full Potential and Build A Business That Builds Leaders.

Key Takeaway:

Leadership has gone through a dramatic shift and we’re missing out on the opportunity to use businesses as a way to grow human beings as leaders. Robert Glazer joins me in this episode to talk about how leaders can help develop their people as well as the organization for long-term success — all while keeping everyone fulfilled in both work and life.

Questions I ask Robert Glazer:

  • [1:45] Would you characterize this as the new generation of leadership?
  • [2:35] People are leaving jobs left and right because they aren’t fulfilled. Do you see this as a trend moving forward?
  • [4:51] How essential is building trust when it comes to leadership?
  • [6:16] How important is it to check your egos to gain a level of self-awareness before you can even start down this path?
  • [7:35] Would you say that the things you talk about, your ideas, this approach, this mentality, this mindset is something that you found inherently in you or that came naturally to you as a way to build this business?
  • [10:33]  You have for many years now written a newsletter you call Friday Forward. How much of how you think about elevating your team came from what you learned writing that?
  • [13:18] Do you think everybody in an organization needs to be looked at as a leader?
  • [18:03] If you have everyone on your team reaching or at least feeling like they’re moving toward their full potential, what kind of marketing or brand impact do you suppose that has for an organization?
  • [20:29] Want to tell people where they might connect with you, learn more about your work, but obviously also pick up a copy of the book?

More About Robert Glazer:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts.

(00:47): Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch. My guest today is Robert Glazer. He is the founder and chairman of the Board of Acceleration Partners, a global partner marketing agency, and the recipient of numerous industry and company culture awards, including Glassdoor’s Employees Choice Awards two years in a row. He’s the author of the Inspirational Newsletter Friday Forward and the number one Wall Street Journal, USA Today and international bestselling author, five books I think you’ve been on for Elevate for Friday forward. We’re gonna talk about his latest book, elevate Your Team, empower Your Team to reach their full potential and build a business that builds leaders. So Robert, welcome back to the show.

Robert Glazer (01:33): Thanks John. I see you again and

John Jantsch (01:35): The dog barked on cue. Yeah,

Robert Glazer (01:37): That’s perfect. Right, right, right, right on cue. Yeah,

John Jantsch (01:39): , the dog is happy to the, you’re back on as

Robert Glazer (01:42): Well, . And he didn’t even hear you say it whole lot . You saw the mailman.

John Jantsch (01:47): Absolutely. So, so would you characterize this as sort of the new generation of leadership, you know, books or new, you know, leadership training? I mean that it’s kind of out with the old sort of hierarchical leadership?

Robert Glazer (02:00): Yeah, yeah. I think I talked a little bit about a new leadership playbook. I think this transition has been happening for some time. I think it’s been masked the last couple years with sort of high growth, low interest rate, you know, super stimulus kind of company unicorn, but command and control died in the military, uh, a long time ago. And now with a societal level of burnout that we’re seeing. I just don’t see how the old playbook is going to work for building an organization that that requires constantly swapping people out, going forward.

John Jantsch (02:35): Well, and I mean a couple dynamics of course that make the news every day, people are struggling to find people, period. People are leaving jobs that are not fulfilling because the last couple years haven’t been very fulfilling in some cases. And so, I mean, do changes like that in the workplace that are happening right now? I mean, is that something that you see as a trend going forward or is that really this little bubble that we’re in for a few years?

Robert Glazer (03:01): We’ve had a lot of ups and downs, you know, power dynamic between employer and plan. And it depends on what industry you’re in, right? If you’re in hospitality or travel or whatever, you have all the power in the world. If you’re in digital marketing and e-commerce right now, it’s not pretty. Yeah. So you probably don’t want to quiet quit, but I just think we’re missing, I think we’re missing the opportunity to use businesses as a way to grow human beings, grow them as leaders and you know, talk about this concept of capacity building, but you know, work on things that help poop improve people both in the business outside the business. And I, you know, I’m very sort of, I, there, there’s camps, right? There’s the oh results and then people like I, I’m in the middle. Like I, I think you should really try to take care of and grow your people, but also you need results.

(03:45): You need performance and you can’t look, you know, the other way at those things. And a lot of those cases, that’s someone who’s just doing something that they shouldn’t be doing or is doing the wrong thing and you’re not helping them either. So I think that with work from home and all these changes, I just don’t, I don’t, I’ve always said like, I don’t think you, like imagine the person who wakes up at home and is super groggy and tired and bad with money and sucks at per prioritization and they just kind of show up as a different person at work five minutes later. I don’t think that’s the case. So I think it’s like you’re gonna, if you wanna work on , if you wanna have people be better at prioritization and time management and their health and kind of have energy and doing a lot of these things, like, that actually kind of needs to be a holistic approach

John Jantsch (04:29): When you start talking about a holistic, I was gonna ask you about remote, because obviously that’s changed, you know, everybody’s leadership, you know, it’s like I don’t ever see my team now, right? Yeah. You know, how do I lead them? But how, how central is the idea of building trust? First? I’m gonna envision somebody reading your book and going, this is what we’re gonna do. But we’ve never been that , you know, before. I mean, so how essential if I’m gonna actually like go to Robert and say, I’m gonna help you achieve all of your dreams both in work and out outside of work and you know, it’s like what Yeah. You know, how essential is it to build trust first?

Robert Glazer (05:04): I like it. I talk about this a lot. I see way too many leaders managed to the exception . Yeah. They, you know, if something’s gonna happen 99 out of a hundred times, like harping on the one that it went in one direction, it’s actually a terrible thing to do. Like Right. Don’t make something goes a certain way 90% of the time. Like make that decision all the time and don’t worry about the 10%. So I’m a big believer in you give trust first, but like one, once trust is broken, it cannot be repaired. Mm-hmm. . So, so I think a lot of people point out to the one person who abused something or otherwise, but if that’s your default approach is not to trust all of your people because of one person that acted in a way, like it kind of is a really bad assumption. But I, so, so I think it’s better to set a threshold, particularly in a remote or otherwise that like, look, we trust you and we expect you act like an adult, but you know, when we find out you were working two jobs or you find out you abused that trust, it’s hard to, to get that back.

John Jantsch (05:57): Yeah. I know the answer to this, but I want to hear how you answer this , you know, how key, cuz one of the underpinnings of this is that we’re gonna help others succeed. Like we’re gonna lift them up. Whereas a lot of people are like, these people are here to help me succeed. So, you know, how important is it to check that ego is to gain a level of self-awareness that you’re doing that, you know, before you can even start down this path?

Robert Glazer (06:26): Yeah, I think peop people look at these things incongruously and they’re not, for example, like the 80 20 rule has never been overcome, you know, that I’ve ever seen. Yeah. And you got a lot of leaders getting a lot of people spinning wheels and working on stuff on crazy hours that just doesn’t matter and isn’t getting results. So it, I’m not sure that’s good for the company, it’s good for the leader, it’s good for the employee versus if you could, you know, I have a whole chapter on getting more outcome oriented, you know, with the business and the results. What are we trying to get to? What does good look like? Like we’re not gonna focus on a million things. We’re gonna focus on those things and there’s the accountability and their performance piece. And that also maybe makes it so that people don’t need to work a hundred hours a week or aren’t getting emails at, you know, 11:00 PM at night. So a lot of these things really, truly are, I wish there was a better word, but they are vicarious or win-win in that what’s good for the business is good for the employee. I, I mean, the 80 20 rule would tell you that, you know, most organizations today tw 80% of what they’re doing is only getting 20% of the right outcomes.

John Jantsch (07:35): W would you say that the things you talk about this approach, this mentality, this mindset is something that you find in, inherent in you that it came natural to you as a way to build this business? Or was this sort of hard one, you know, because you went out and said, well here’s how everybody else builds a business and I guess that’s how you do it.

Robert Glazer (07:53): Yeah. You know, it’s interesting. I looked at a lot of the things that were going on out there and they didn’t make sense. And I wanted to build a type of business that I was excited to, to work in. And I’ve done my core values, I’ve done the y work, like I my is very much around finding a better way and share it. So it’s like, how do we make people better? How do we make the business better? How do we grow that? So, so and, and then we just really saw that worked. Now again, we are high accountability, high performance of growning, 30% a year for almost a decade. Right? It’s not, I think sometimes when people talk about businesses that help people and care about people and all, you know, that there’s this kumbaya family thing. Yeah. And you haven’t grown revenue in a decade.

(08:30): I mean, we’ve been, we’ve grown 4000% in, in, in 10 years. So I, I just didn’t wanna build a growth business that required constantly changing the people. So the question was how do we grow the people and have that be the impetus for growing the business, not artificially grow the business and then drag people along. And most of our leaders have, and look, I, this was a decision five years ago, I said, if, if you were trying to do this now, if you were trying to just grow by telling people to grind it out in 89 hours a week, they’re so burned out that I just don’t think you’ll have any employees. And in this whole world, you’re either gonna have the freelance mercenary for rent people or you’re gonna have one of people that want to be at your company. And there’s something about being at your company that, and particularly if they’re working from home, that it ties together and it helps them, you know, get what they’re looking for in some ways. But none of these things are, you know, helping people like meet their personal goals should directly correlate to helping the organization reach its goals. Yeah. Some of them should be exclusive of each other.

John Jantsch (09:32): Are you an agency owner, consultant or coach that works with business owners? Then I want to talk to you about adding a new revenue stream to your business that will completely change how you work with clients. For the first time ever, you can license and use the Duct Tape Marketing system and methodology in your business through an upcoming three day virtual workshop. Give us three days and you’ll walk away with a complete system that changes how you think about your agency’s growth. The Duct Tape Marketing System is a turnkey set of processes for installing a marketing system that starts with strategy and moves to long-term retainer implementation engagements. We’ve developed a system by successfully working with thousands of businesses. Now you can bring it to your agency and benefit from all the tools, templates, systems and processes we’ve developed to find out when our next workshop is being held. Visit dtm.world/workshop. That’s dtm.world/workshop. You have for many years now written a newsletter you call Friday Forward. It came out on Fridays. You sent it across, typically it was a, almost an internal comms piece, and then eventually grew to following, grew to a book. How much of what you, how you think about elevating your team came from

Robert Glazer (10:54): What

John Jantsch (10:55): You learned writing that

Robert Glazer (10:58): A a lot of it, I’m like a framework person. And so I realized, and when I originally wrote the book, I went to write a compilation book and agent was like, no one likes a compilation book. Like what is it? What have you done? What are the stories? I went back and looked at all the pattern analysis and the categories and that’s where I came up with this whole capacity building construct. That was the premise of both Elevate and elevate your team. And I was like, huh, this is the theme. This is what we’ve, this is what I’ve been doing personally. This is what we’ve been doing around training. We’ve been helping people with spiritual capacity, intellectual, physical, and emotional. Yeah. Like it just sort of, the pattern started to reveal itself. And when I was able to kind of lay out the framework, then I could more say, Hey look, this is, you know, if I went through the the checklist, it’s like that’s how we were training and developing people. Yeah.

John Jantsch (11:43): It’s, it was really encouraging to hear you talk about, you went back and discovered, you know, that you had this framework because I, the reason I asked the question, the way I asked is because I think a lot, lot of people underestimate how much having a regular writing practice, how much you learn from ha about yourself, about, you know Yeah. The world. Because you have to pay attention to put that out there. And I think just doing that is actually, and, and again, people should subscribe to Friday forward because you’re gonna see it’s a different kind of newsletter. But I think that it, you know, that’s one of the essential elements, right? Is, I mean, because consistently writing about those things, you know, at some point people had to say, I guess he means it.

Robert Glazer (12:25): Yeah. And look, the, I think there’s a, you probably feel this way. I know a lot. I think there’s probably a misperception that when I write something, like I had it all figured out, it’s actually the topic. It’s like, huh, I’ve been thinking about this topic for a while and now I’m gonna have to spend two hours and like Right. Come up with an opinion on it. So sometimes it really provides that clarification. Like I said, I like frameworks, so yeah. My writing is sort of about how do you put a concept or idea and a framework that then you can do something with it. You know, when you, like we read a book, you know, and you’re like, oh, I’ve known about this for a while, but just the way that John put it together, like, now I get it and it clicks and I know how to do something with it.

John Jantsch (13:01): Well I, I often, you know, somebody on my team will say, you know, I’d like to learn more about Google ads. And I said, oh great, two weeks from today you’re gonna teach a class on it.

Robert Glazer (13:08): Yeah. .

John Jantsch (13:09): And you know, they immediately learn a whole lot more than it had. I like shared, you know, what I knew about it. So I, I just think there’s a lot to that. Does everybody, does everybody need in an organization, do you view everybody as now you have a professional organization, you have very high level, you have leadership folks naturally. Yeah. You know, titled leadership folks. Do you think everybody in an org organization needs to be looked at as a leader?

Robert Glazer (13:34): No. In fact, you know, there is a whole section on this. I think one of the, you know, the premise first is look, give everyone the best chance to be successful in their organization. Yeah. But then you also need to be objective about what the organization needs and what people skillsets are and what they’re good at. And a lot of people, you know, with this word, a lot of people frankly want to be good individual contributors. Right. I think the biggest mistake historically an organization makes, right? They promote the sales person into a sales manager when they just wanna sell and the commission or the engineer into an engineering manager. Generally, I, some people aren’t really interested in managing and leading. They wanna produce and they wanna deliver and you shouldn’t cap their upside. But they are, you know, they get their good feelings from, you know, whatever they did.

(14:19): Personally, a leader, when you come a leader, you need to switch your reward center from what it is that you did. But first what that your team did. And some people just aren’t interested in that and Yeah. Because we want ’em to move up the arch chart and pay more money. Like, like we, you know, put them in charge of teams and frankly, if you’ve got a man or a woman that can sell 10 million a year, like don’t crack their commission. Like let them keep selling. Don’t make ’em managed salespeople. If that’s not what they want to do. They, if they wanna be a rainmaker, let ’em be a rainmaker. Yeah.

John Jantsch (14:52): And, and I think the real key you’re saying is work as hard as you can to get people in the right spot. Right spot for them. Right. Doing the right things because they’ll thrive.

Robert Glazer (15:02): Yeah. But look, help them build their capacity, help them learn all this stuff. Yeah. One of the things they may learn is that they don’t do some pre leadership stuff that I don’t like leadership. I like selling, delivering. You know, I like getting all the credit myself. Like I think if people then can be honest with themselves, if you can have that dialogue and the organization can be honest with them, you know, we had someone years ago who just, you know, was in a leadership role and we reversed them out of that leadership role and put ’em in a contributor role. Cause we’re like, look, you don’t like your leading your team. They don’t like having you as a leader. You like to just do stuff and get credit for it. Like we, here’s a contributor role that you could be good at. Yeah.

John Jantsch (15:42): Well and the key there too is that, you know, every organization needs somebody who geeks out on Google Analytics, right. Or whatever it is. I mean you need those tools. It wants

Robert Glazer (15:51): To be the best analytics person, the best engineer, the best salesperson, right? The there there’s not a manager of Google Analytics. I think that’s fine. So I think for that reason too, I think you need to, you, you might have training, you might, you know, for young up and coming leaders, but you also need to give ’em an escape, you know, route too. If they start down that process and realize it’s not the right thing,

John Jantsch (16:13): It’s become very trendy to talk about leaders needing to be coaches and coaching their teams. You know, where do you fall on that idea?

Robert Glazer (16:21): Yeah, look, I, a leader’s job is to make I think the sum of the parts greater than the whole, right? And so they should be talking to their team increasingly not telling what to do, but finding out where their blockers are, what they need, discussing problems with them, not solving the problems, but discussing the problems, talking about resources. So yeah, I think the coach mentor, you know, is the, I mean that to me that’s the difference between a leader and a manager. A manager just takes the sum of the parts and tells people what to do and moves the chips on the board. Like, you know, a leader is trying to get something that is more than the sum of the parts. And so I think that is the modern analogy of, you know, people talk about my friend Jamon McCormick, you know, wrote a book like Modern Leadership, but the modern leaders on the bottom of the org chart, like, Hey, I work for my team and how do I make you better get outta your way? Remove obstacles. Again, that true leader who sees their success as how well their team does, not how well they do. And by the way, this is a huge thing that most organizations miss. I would say 80 to 90% of organizations do not rate their managers as managers. , they rate them based on their contribution. So they’re totally rewarding the wrong thing. If you have a leader, someone who manages two, three, or four, five people, the number one thing that you need to be rating them on is how good of a leader they are. .

(17:42): If you rate them on their production, then you’re then, you know, if their teams, if it’s a sales leader and the team is all meeting their goals, but they, they all hate ’em or heard and they’re, you know, they’re all looking for a job and one person’s way ahead of their quota and isn’t getting promoted and one’s under their quota is not getting fired. But they’re all like, again, the results mask. That person is not doing their job as a leader. Yeah.

John Jantsch (18:04): So we started talking about this before I hit record and I want to loop back to it, you know, part of the subtitle Empower your Team to reach their full potential if you have one on your team reaching or at least feeling like they’re moving towards their full potential. What kind of marketing or brand impact do you suppose that has for an organization?

Robert Glazer (18:21): Yeah, look, I think they’re fundamentally three types of organizations. I talk about this in the book. The first is a star sniffling and I worked at one of these outside of school, like this is where like me, you know, te you know, mediocrity just tried to stay in place and like good talent left as fast as they could. It was like, you know, there was a whole group of people who just were protecting their job and knew the politics and otherwise. So like while that organization is bankrupt, like everyone I worked with is doing an amazing thing. Like it was one of my first jobs out of college. So the second is catch and release, right? I think these are the organizations that develop people and when they don’t have an opportunity or there’s two people going for one job, they’re actually happy to help that person.

(19:00): And you know, like seeing them go somewhere else and be successful. Patty McCord used to say, we love to see people go be from Netflix. And I think that’s really powerful, the brand and pretty awesome. The hardest one and the one that I think you can’t be all the time is sort of a true meritocracy. An organization that is willing to put the best person on the field, you know, at any time. And you know, my historical example from this in the book is that in 2001, right, the, the Patriots had just signed Drew Bledso for $103 million. I think Bill Belichick is the best example historically of this. It doesn’t matter what you’re paid, where you’re drafted, otherwise whoever is performing best will get the role. And Bledso got hurt. And when he, you know, the sixth round quarterback skinny kid that, you know, no one knew Belichick left him in there.

(19:46): And when the quarterback came back he said, he’s playing really well. I’m not gonna take him out. I mean you’re talking about he doesn’t make that decision and Tom Brady’s not the best player of all time. Very few managers I think are willing to make that decision or take someone and say, look, this person is objectively higher achieving and better than other, we are going to push them forward. So I think we’re all organizations actually are all flavors of those at time to time. But if you want to build a great brand as an organization, one where people can move up on their own merit or the organization supports them to go take better roles elsewhere, like I think that those are places that people wanna work.

John Jantsch (20:24): Speaking with Robert Glazer, he is the author of Elevate Your Team. So Robert, you want to invite people where they might connect with you, learn more about your work, but obviously also pick up a copy of the book.

Robert Glazer (20:35): Yeah, it’s all@robertglazer.com. You can find my podcast there. Book and Friday Ford and would love to, to have everyone join. Awesome.

John Jantsch (20:44): Well thanks again for stopping by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast and hopefully we’ll run into you again soon. One of these days out there on the road. Thanks John. Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co. Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

Why You Should Stop Settling For Plan B So You Can Unleash Your Full Potential

Why You Should Stop Settling For Plan B So You Can Unleash Your Full Potential written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Matt Higgins

Matt Higgins, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing PodcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Matt Higgins. Matt is a self-made entrepreneur who went from poverty to the top of five industries and now serves as a guest Shark on ABC’s hit series Shark Tank. He will soon star in a new spinoff Business Hunters also executive produced by Mark Burnett. Matt is also the author of Burn The Boat: Toss Plan B Overboard and Unleash Your Full Potential.

Key Takeaway:

Ready to take your dreams from pipe dreams to reality? Matt Higgins explains how the age-old strategy of “burning the boats” can help you get there. It’s not just for wartime anymore! Across his journey, he absorbed stories of world leaders and inspiring figures that enabled him to put together a template – one available for anyone who works hard enough, and he’s sharing it with us in this episode.

Questions I ask Matt Higgins:

  • [1:21] If somebody were to ask you how you got here, what’s the five-minute version of what your entrepreneurial journey has been like?
  • [5:34] What is the story behind the metaphor “burn the boat”?
  • [11:47] Do you think that people come to the conclusion that they burn the boats in hindsight? Is sometimes luck at play?
  • [14:30] Would you say there’s an element of things getting easier, less scary, and more clear once you practice the art of fully committing to things?
  • [19:10] Tell us a little bit about the spinoff Business Hunters.
  • [21:59] What cool resources come with the book and where can people pick up a copy?

More About Matt Higgins:

Learn More About The Agency Intensive Certification:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your s. Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch. My guest today is Matt Higgins. He’s a self-made entrepreneur who went from poverty to the top of five industries and now serves as a guest shark on ABC’s Hit series Shark Tank. He’ll soon star in a new spinoff, business Hunters, also executive produced by Mark Burnett. He’s the author of a new book called Burn the Boats, toss Plan B Overboard and Unleash Your Full Potential. So Matt, welcome to the show.

Matt Higgins (01:19): All right, thank you for having me.

John Jantsch (01:21): Like many entrepreneurs, you have a long and winding journey. If somebody were to wade into, you know how you got here, I wonder if you have the five minute version of kinda like what’s been your entrepreneurial journey. You obviously are at a, you know, a lot of times people will look at somebody and go, oh, he is on Shark Tank. He’s, you know, made it, you know, but they a lot of times look back or don’t look back at like the stuff you had to crawl over to get there.

Matt Higgins (01:45): . No, I appreciate you saying that. Well, winding is one way to put it. Some would say incoherent, but , we can sort of explain the genesis of everything. But I don’t wanna begin with what you just said cuz I love it. A lot of the reasons why I wrote this book was I don’t wanna be perceived as the guy at the end of the journey on Shark Tank. That’s just the manifestation of it. I think more useful to look at my life where I came from, hopefully to model what overcoming those circumstances looks like. I spent my whole life engineering my way out of bad situations. Some, I was born into others, I put myself into like everybody else listening, but, but my journey starts with the one I was born into. I grew up in Queens, New York, the product of a single mom, and these words, abject poverty, take on almost like a cliche meaning.

(02:26): So just to make it sound, what does that really mean? Growing up with basically wondering where the next meal was coming from. Grow up on government cheese, little blocks of cheese from the U S D A and food pantries. So just a lot of instability, fragility in my upbringing. And my mother had a lot of disabilities that were compounding over time. She is a high, she was a high school dropout, but really fiercely intelligent. And these all my worlds were colliding as a kid where food was an issue. I was selling flowers on street corners and I was watching my mother deteriorate. And you go through so many disappointments in life where you hope the calorie’s gonna come. And I learned, fortunately, for better or worse at a very young age, that the cavalry never comes. And so I was getting increasingly desperate. And around 1314, I, I had an epiphany, wait a second, my mother got a G E D and she was able to go to college with the ged.

(03:13): I was like, I was looking at the PennySaver, a little local newspaper in Queens and there was a job offer for a kid to deliver flyers, but it said college students only. And I was like, what’s this special thing called college student? What if I could drop outta high school at 16 and get it at $9 an hour paying job instead of making 3 75 at McDonald’s, could I pull forward my escape from poverty? So my entire entrepreneurial journey begins with me architecting my way and why that origin story is so important because it really put me through everything an entrepreneur has to go through. One, my guidance counselor said, you’re absolutely crazy. The stigma of you being a high school dropout will follow you forever. This is before a little Mark Zuckerberg with his hoodie I made a

John Jantsch (03:53): Four was trendy. Right, okay.

Matt Higgins (03:54): Before it’s trendy things, right? So that was number one. So I have the conventional wisdom of the world and the question of, well you’re not gonna know enough to go to college. I was like, I don’t know. I don’t think that’s necessarily true. And the fact that no one had ever done not, no one people hadn’t done it deliberately, certainly actually dropped outta high school and poor as a fan, right. As a, yeah. You know? And then the last piece is really important is that I realized I had so much pressure for me to change paths. I used to sit at McDonald’s all day, get picked up by the truancy police, carted back . You know, there was all these forces saying like conform, but yet nobody had the full context of the fact that I was sleeping on a d on a dirty mattress on the floor.

(04:32): My mother was, would cry through the entire night in pain. I would wrap a towel around my head so I could hear through the fibers, but try to sleep. So, you know, I’m under constant duress as a kid pretending to be affluent with my jordash jeans that I bought, you know, with whatever money I had. So like I’m putting on a mask my gut, everyone giving me advice, can’t see the truth. So the advice is corrupted because it doesn’t have full information created by me, you know, hiding my shame. So I had to go through that crazy decision to drop outta high school 16. And in one chess move I went from high school dropout where everyone’s looking at me with pity to a year later going to my high school prom as a finishing my first year in college on the debate team, three five GPA and a well paying job compared to McDonald’s. And I remember the look on my guidance counselor, my teachers that had win from one of sadness and it’s probably a degree of disdain to one of admiration. And so everything about my entrepreneurial journey and a lot of the in incoherence of it, the way my look on paper, all these different industries can be explained from that one move.

John Jantsch (05:34): So, so remind le listeners, probably most people have heard one version or another of this story, but the metaphor burned the boats, the story behind that.

Matt Higgins (05:42): Yeah. So I, I’ve, you know, despite my quote unquote success, you know, I’ve always tackled with the lingering effects of the story I just told you, you know, it’s a degree of, yeah, PTSD and trauma. There’s obviously more to it and anxiety and whatnot and all those things create hesitation. And so I get so mad at myself when I know in order to succeed I need to fully commit and I need to slay the naysayers in my head or the external forces that are trying to stand on my way. I know that intellectually, but I don’t believe it. And I was like, what does it take to fully believe that in order to be successful and achieve plan A, you have to fully surrender to the goal? Why do we hesitate? And I noticed throughout my career this phrase would keep coming up, burn the boats, and then I would look back in history like, wow, you know, Caesar said it right?

(06:26): You know, it’s in the art of war, right? It goes back to the ancient Israeli lights. This idea of that in a military context, when you’re outnumbered a hundred to one, the way that you could sum an unnatural resolve from your troops is to destroy their way home. In the article where they say, you know, burn the boats and the, and destroy the cooking pots, and that obviously that makes people say, I have no choice but to win h how can I take that co that concept and appropriate it for peacetime activity? Yeah. And so the word boat is a little bit different than used in a military context. My boat are all the things in your life that force you to hesitate and hold back.

John Jantsch (07:01): Yeah. The cushy job that you got right now,

Matt Higgins (07:03): The cushy job you got. But more often, as the Italians say, the fish rots from the head, the cover of my boat is a paper boat and it’s meant to be a child’s boat floating in a bathtub and it’s on fire in Cindy Air. And the reason why I start with that metaphor is because a lot of the things that hold us back are legacy issues that we haven’t synthesized shame. And for a number of years, the story I just told you would be something I wouldn’t talk about because I wouldn’t wanna show vulnerability and I had cancer and a bunch of other issues I went through. So the first mandate of my book was model what it looks like to shed shame, show people that everybody who has transcended their circumstances had to go through that journey and then try basically articulate all the different kinds of boats that we have to burn before achieving greatness. And a lot, and it’s not rocket science. The rocket science comes in execution, not in our, not in identifying, but the b the themes in my book that’ll be familiar to your listeners are imposter gen drum, the corporate saboteurs, all these of these obstacles. But it’s basically a treat toe on hesitation and how to commit.

John Jantsch (08:01): Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s interesting. I work with a lot of startup owners and many of them jumping out of corporate jobs and in some cases, you know, it took ’em three years or they tried to do both at the same time and found that they weren’t, you know, they were struggling with both. Yeah. So I, you know, I do think that there is a fear that stops people because you, you know, a lot of, lot of take the leap or you know, how other metaphors that people use, I mean they really, starting a business is, you know, a leap of faith in, in some cases. I want to go to a line that I read, I think it was in another interview you gave but, or maybe it was, was just a build up on the book, but why research proves that the mere contemplation of plan B statistically reduces the probability plan A will ever materialize. I think that’s a pretty profound backing for this idea of burning the boats, isn’t it?

Matt Higgins (08:52): Yeah, it’s, that’s a great point. Well the, well, so I put a lot, lot of energy in the book to buttress this idea because it’s at the same time, it’s kind of simplistic and there’s a lot of people listening who will reflexively say, yeah, I heard that before, burn the boats, but risk. But I have kit Mals to feed, but I have rent to pay. Right? So number one, the idea of burn the boats doesn’t mean the boats with you in it. And by the way, burn the,

John Jantsch (09:13): That is a huge clarification. Okay. Yeah,

Matt Higgins (09:16): That’s what I’m saying. Little caveat, ask her why that’s important because I am the most paranoid risk taker you’re probably ever gonna have on your show. Like I process risk thoroughly and I work backwards from the worst case scenario so that I can ensure that if the worst thing I can imagine what happened, would I still be okay? And the answer’s always yes, but I argue and burn the boats is not a shoe all risk or ignore it, it synthesize it at the start of the journey. And by the way, here’s how you do it so that you can go ahead and you could fearlessly, you know, move forward. And a lot of people don’t do that. Now, the science that you’re talking about, there was a study at a warden, which I think is so fascinating, it was 2014, they decided to see if they could identify what, what is the underlying, you know, consequence of anyone not actually having a plan B, but simply comp contemplating a plan B.

(10:01): And I won’t get into how they recreated it in the study setting, but all the subjects had to do was just think about another way they could get that snack, you know, in the study, whatever the stimuli was, right? And it found out that just thinking about it both eliminated the probability that they would succeed with plan A, but also killed their intrinsic motivation. So my book is meant to also be a retort to any one of you out there listening who’s going? But no, we get into the butts , everybody who I profiled this book, 50 different CEOs, founders, scar athletes, artists, N F L coaches had their butts to the point is to process the butts and put them in their place and then move forward and to prove to you through science, history, psychology and otherwise that just thinking about that Plan B is truly killing your plan

John Jantsch (10:46): A, are you an agency owner, consultant or coach that works with business owners? Then I want to talk to you about adding a new revenue stream to your business that will completely change how you work with clients. For the first time ever, you can license and use the Duct Tape marketing system and methodology in your business through an upcoming three day virtual workshop. Give us three days and you’ll walk away with a complete system that changes how you think about your agency’s growth. The Duct Tape Marketing system is a turnkey set of processes for installing a marketing system that starts with strategy and moves to long-term retainer implementation engagements. We’ve developed this system by successfully working with thousands of businesses. Now you can bring it to your agency and benefit from all the tools, templates, systems and processes we’ve developed to find out when our next workshop is being held.

(11:38): Visit DTM world slash workshop. That’s DTM world slash workshop. Do you think sometimes people come to the conclusion that they burn the boats in hindsight? So in other words, like they really only saw there was like, this is what I think I need to do, or this is what I was told to do and next thing you turn around and it’s like, I succeeded and now I look back and go, oh, because I didn’t have a plan B. I mean was is it sometimes, I guess I’m talking about luck almost , you know, is it sometimes that is at play?

Matt Higgins (12:10): Yeah, I think that’s true. I do, I’m a big anti luck person if there is such a thing because I think a lot of times luck is sort of robs you of agency. Yeah. And I think sometimes luck is a dirty four wet alert that people use against you to say, well, you know, you didn’t manifest it. So I think that the universe is fundamentally benevolent and does give you multiple opportunities to save yourself. And so a lot of times you’re reconstructing, you’re right in hindsight like the, I think it’s more you’re reconstructing what was the turning point? What was the moment when I finally actually pulled it off? And usually the moment I find in dealing with so many CEOs, I’m sure you have a similar experience, the moment that actually led to the breakthrough was the moment they stopped giving an F about something that was recurring in their head, it was the moment of almost capitulation like, you know what, I have a great story in my book of founder, it’s one of my favorite stories in all business.

(12:59): And he was a founder, an amazing guy. I bought his company and I knew frankly he was gonna get eaten alive by the investors that we had brought in. He just wasn’t ready for primetime and he wasn’t dealing with some of the hard staff choices that he needed to upgrade the team. He was just a martyr who was taken all upon himself and ultimately the walls began to crash in on him. And he calls me one night crying saying, I failed you, I’m gonna resign at the end of the year. And I heard in the background an EKG or you know, the beeping machine. I said, what is that? He’s like, well I’m in the hospital. My, my little baby girl we’re testing her for seizures. We think she might be on the spectrum. I said, first of all, why are you calling me? Hang up the phone.

(13:36): Go. Second of all, I’m the one who makes this phone call. I, when I’m, when you’re done, I’ll call you. You don’t have to worry about that. I will let you know. I said, but actually I think you’re not done. I think you just got started. And he hangs up the phone. True story. We bring in an industrial psychologist, he surrenders to the work, he credits stat as the breakthrough moment when he started realizing, you know what, if this were to fall apart, whatever, Matt will be fine. I lost a few million for him, you know, my family will eat, I’ll be okay. I’m an Irish bartender, I came here, I built this country. Eight months later he sells that business for nine figures and it was a zero 18 months later and it was a zero at that moment. And he has enough money to feed his children for generations. And so I share that story and all these stories like it so people can pick a moment to identify it like, oh I have a disabled child. I felt like that. Or you know what I mean? Even with me being a high school dropout, I was like, oh, I grew up in poverty. Matt could do it. Maybe I could do it too.

John Jantsch (14:30): Would you say there’s an element, maybe talking about you personally, but maybe you’ve seen this also of building habit muscle around this. Like you do it once and you go, wow, that worked out, nobody died here and the next time it’s easier and the next time it’s clearer. I mean, would you say that has happened to you?

Matt Higgins (14:48): There’s a hundred percent I get frustrated that it’s not, not more habituated, you know what I mean? I get mad at myself like, come on, you know this already, right? Like yeah, you’d be shocked if you were in my head as you’re listening to this, you’d be shocked by the things that I revisit. But I’ve come to realize the awareness of it is a habit that I need to burn the boats and fully commit to extract maximum. Right? And I have the fact patterns, but the reason why it doesn’t always hold is because I’m always doing new hard things. And so the reason why I talk about imposter syndrome in the set of Shark Tank when I was arguably very successful is to show if you are putting yourself in truly new and uncomfortable situations, you are always feeling like an imposter because you are an imposter, you’re an interloper for sure another I word, but you’re also interloper and imposter feel kind of similar.

(15:32): And so the answer is it gets easier with muscle memory, but if it ever gets too easy, it means you’re not putting yourself in new really hard situations. Yeah. Like when I went to Harvard to Harvard Business School, I’d never taught a day in my life, one could argue, well your ego should have carried you or your sense of self-worth of self-esteem. It’s like bullshit. Like I’m teaching in Harvard, like this is hard and like, and so I had those emotions and then next time it got easier and then by the third time I have to find a new intrinsic motivation system cuz I’m no longer full of anxiety. Right. So it does get habituated, but at the same time it should never get too habituated.

John Jantsch (16:03): Yeah. I mean when I listen to you describe that, it’s, you’re really talking about growth, continued growth, aren’t you?

Matt Higgins (16:07): Right. Right. There’s, I always say there’s a reason growing pains hurt, right? Like they’re supposed to hurt. And sometimes people say about my book, they’re like, oh God, it sounds exhausting. Do you ever get to relax? And I said, the answer is no. And the reason why talk to anyone who’s been to the top of the mountain and they’ll tell you there’s not much to see there. I really believe that the joy of living is in the striving and it’s not in the winning, which is a little bit contradictory cuz then you’re like, well then what are we fighting for? I think we’re fighting for to touch the ceiling of our ambition, our potential. So that I think that brings us closer to God. I, when I see a person who’s struggling to break through and I can make a slight trajectory change in our life and I watch them get closer to touching the ceiling of their potential, even though it’s unknowable, I feel like I’m watching God and magic and the universe sort of play out. And I think we all have that feeling in ourselves. It’s when we run the marathon, there’s a reason we’re depressed when marathon’s over and we wish we were still training for it, right? Because we were pursuing the ceiling of our potential.

John Jantsch (17:04): It’s interesting, I use this metaphor all the time, you know, a lot of people talking about striving to the climb Everest, you know, to get to the top, I mean, how dangerous it is and how hard it is. About three times more people die coming down actually going up. True. And I think that’s such a great metaphor, you know, for kind of that idea of climbing and then like, you know, going back down

Matt Higgins (17:22): of course now no listens to this is gonna climb, but like damn I’m gonna die on the way back just when I thought I succeeded. Right, .

John Jantsch (17:28): Exactly. There’s a

Matt Higgins (17:29): Lot of, a lot of lessons in that simple fact by the way, in terms of we get to wifi, but

John Jantsch (17:33): Yeah. Yeah. So, so you did, as you mentioned, dozens, maybe more than dozens of interviews for this. Do you have, this is always a hard question when people do this, but do you have a couple favorites or a couple you like to highlight?

Matt Higgins (17:45): Oh, interviews I’ve done?

John Jantsch (17:47): No, that you did for the book in

Matt Higgins (17:49): Particular? Oh, you mean interviews around the book that I really like?

John Jantsch (17:52): Yeah, yeah. With different leaders.

Matt Higgins (17:53): Oh, in the book? Yes, for sure. I’m so sorry. Yeah, you know what, there’s a woman profiled in the book and she had created a marketing firm called Village. Right? And when I was working on the book, our interaction and sort of fade in the back of my memory and her name had kept coming up throughout my career. And then at one point I realized, wait, I know her actually I had interviewed her before she had created this business cuz I tried to recruit her to join my business a new PR eight years ago. And I reconnected with her and it was one of these sliding door moments where she had a choice to join my new firm, right? And instead she went off and created the, this firm called The Village. And the reason why she did it is because she decided she needed to burn the boats and give it a shot, or she never would.

(18:38): And she had a little baby daughter and she wanted to try to create a firm that would be designed to enable her to raise her daughter the way she wanted to. So instead of joining my firm, she created her own and she only hired women. It was an all woman firm. And at the exact moment, within three months that I sold the firm I built that she passed on, she sold her own and created massive generational wealth. And I tell the story of that, I tell the story in the book of a lot of female entrepreneurs because my whole life has been guided by strong women. So I just, you know, it happens to be a lot of incredible stories, but I’d say hers is one of my favorites.

John Jantsch (19:11): So tell us a little bit about the spinoff that I don’t think it’s out yet. Bus business hunters.

Matt Higgins (19:15): Yeah. Yeah, so, so for everyone listening, I’ve been on Shark Tank a couple seasons, I love Shark Tank and you know, shark Tank as a kid would always give me hope and like everybody else sitting watching that show. Yeah. But there’s one part that is missing from Shark Tank. We all love it. But if you actually take a step back, how many people can really relate to the idea that you have an invention that is good enough that’s gonna put you in front of Mark Cuban and the rest to try to get venture funding. It’s actually a very alien concept that most people will never, ever get close to. What we love about Shark Tank is the act of going for it. The sort of glory of, you know, getting that investment of winning. Like it just has, everything’s on display cuz every single person at some point or another has harbored either an idea or more like autonomy and freedom that comes to be a business owner.

(19:56): We have a crappy boss. Or like, I just wanna quit. I just would love to it. Right? So I realized Mark Burnett realized that there isn’t a show that speaks to that impulse. What if we created a show that was designed to take anyone in America who has a dream for like a restaurant or a drag cleaner or like a marina, you know, how do I buy that business? How do I get the financing for it? How do I value it? And so the show takes usually a tandem, a husband and wife, a couple or something. And we, we both break down the psychological issues that go into becoming a new business owner because has these like, oh, it’s gonna be a great, I’m gonna have a restaurant, I’m gonna take weekends off. Like, no, you’re not, because your cap door, your inventory’s gonna disappear. You’ll be working seven days away.

(20:37): So a lot of it are those disabusing people of misperceptions about what it means to be a business owner. But the second part of the journey is let me present you with three different ideas. So, and then let’s evaluate them together. And then we give an opportunity for the entrepreneurs to actually work in those businesses before they buy them. Oh, nice. And then we, that’s very cool. I try to teach the audience because I get excited about like everything from like an ice cream truck, you know, to a hundred million acquisition. Everything excites me that try to teach the audience about this area of the business sector that’s kind of unexplored. So, you know, the business could cost, we have one business, it’s $75,000. I mean, these are not, you know, of businesses.

John Jantsch (21:14): Yeah. Well I’m sure you’ve got it all wired, but I want to come be a, a guest host on the thing because I’ve done, I’ve been doing this for 35 years and I’ve worked with 10,000 small businesses. I mean people you’re talking about.

Matt Higgins (21:26): I would love that. It’s so fun. And then, you know what’s interesting about it? As somebody who’s worked on, you know, whatever billion dollar deals and everything’s the same , you know, like, you know, how do I value, you know, ebitda, what does EBITDA mean? Like what, right. How do I balance cash outlay versus feeding my family growth versus every, all they all the same issues. I always say once you have two people working for you, you got the same kinds of problems that anybody else does. You know, coach, but anyone would love to have you on. And we finished shooting the show and right now we’re in the process of finding a home for it. But I assume by the time this airs or sometime thereafter, the network will be announced.

John Jantsch (21:58): Awesome. So you have in selling burn the boats. You have like a lot of authors just kind of buy extra books, get bonuses, but your bonuses are really fun. You’ve got some, you know, go to a Dolphins game, you know, come, I mean just don’t up in front.

Matt Higgins (22:14): I definitely have nice toys.

John Jantsch (22:16): . Yeah. Yeah. So I will say though that I’m a Chiefs fan and you know, we’re looking to win the Super Bowl again. We gave you Tyrek to try to help you out a little bit, but we’re still going back to the Super Bowl.

Matt Higgins (22:28): Yes. No, I have a, I have a, it’s called Burn the Boats book.com is the website and, and I wanted to make it fun and come up with unique packages. I have a lot of interesting businesses in my portfolio, so Right. One of them is we’re doing a session with Gary Vaynerchuk, who’s my partner, and just if you check out the website, all sorts of cool and interesting things. Yeah.

John Jantsch (22:45): Very fun. Well, Matt, thanks so much for stopping by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast and hopefully we will run into you one of these days soon out there on the road.

Matt Higgins (22:52): All right, thank you for having me. I appreciate

John Jantsch (22:54): It. Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy strategy before Tex? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it@marketingassessment.co not.com Check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

 

The Winning Agency Formula For Steady Growth And Continuous Profit

The Winning Agency Formula For Steady Growth And Continuous Profit written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Marcel Petitpas

Marcel Petitpas, a guest on the Duct Tape Marketing podcastIn this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Marcel Petitpas. Marcel is the CEO & Co-Founder of Parakeeto, a company dedicated to helping agencies measure and improve their profitability by streamlining their operations and reporting systems. Marcel is also the fractional COO at Gold Front and a speaker, podcast host, and consultant, specializing in Agency Profitability Optimization.

Key Takeaway:

The most profitable agencies have a winning formula that results in happy returning clients, steady growth, and continuous profit. In this episode, the CEO and Co-founder of Parakeeto, Marcel Petitpas, shares his insights on what that winning formula looks like and how agencies can optimize their businesses for profitability.

Questions I ask Marcel Petitpas:

  • [1:49] What should we be measuring if we want to optimize for profitability?
  • [4:14] When it comes to KPIs, how do we strike the right balance between too much information or narrowing in on the right things to track?
  • [6:40] Where can people find your agency profitability toolkit and checklist?
  • [7:24] One of the hardest things to measure is internal staff working on various accounts. How do you spread that kind of unit of labor across where it should be expended?
  • [11:03] What do you see as the most useful way to do billing?
  • [16:00] Everyone in the organization should be tracking their time. Yes or no?
  • [17:51] What kind of challenge does white labeling add to the pure optimization model?
  • [20:05] Why wouldn’t you use a resource plan with your white label partners to some degree?
  • [20:52] How much responsibility do you think that marketing agencies have to really get that deep inside an organization?
  • [23:04] Where can people find out more about Parakeeto and the work you do on behalf of agencies?

More About Marcel Petitpas:

Learn More About The Agency Certification Intensive:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

HubSpot Podcast Network is the audio destination for business professionals who seek the best education and inspiration on how to grow a business.

 

 

How To Quickly Double Your Sales

How To Quickly Double Your Sales written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

Marketing Podcast with Amanda Holmes

In this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Amanda Holmes. Amanda is the CEO of Chet Holmes International (CHI) which has worked with over 250,000 businesses worldwide. At age 24, she inherited her father’s multi-million dollar enterprise, which specializes in helping companies double their sales. She’s the author of a book — Based on The Ultimate Sales Machine: Turbocharge Your Business with Relentless Focus on 12 Key Strategies.

Key Takeaway:

At just 24, Amanda Holmes inherited her father’s multi-million dollar enterprise – Chet Holmes International. Without much direction, she had to navigate the uncharted waters of running an enterprise at that scale. In this episode, Amanda shares more about her journey as CEO and the challenges of implementing change in a long-standing organization. Amanda dives into the process her father developed years ago that has helped large companies quickly double their sales and how she has helped that process evolve over the years.

Watch this Episode on YouTube

Questions I ask Amanda Holmes:

  • [2:49] What was it like being thrust into an ongoing organization as a family member?
  • [6:04] What was hard for you to change?
  • [7:58] What’s been the most fun for you when it comes to stepping into the CEO role of Chet Holmes International?
  • [9:26] Would you say that your music and arts background has brought a level of creativity that maybe didn’t exist in the org before?
  • [11:50] Who is your typical client at CHI?
  • [13:17] A core concept of your coaching is Dream 100 – can you describe what this is?
  • [17:48] One of the challenges you alluded to – we’re so focused on digital right now, you particularly have yourselves firmly in what you’re calling old-school processes – would you say that the old-school processes are working better than ever?
  • [19:59] Where can people find out more about you and your work?

More About Amanda Holmes:

Like this show? Click on over and give us a review on iTunes, please!

John Jantsch (00:00): This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Nudge, hosted by Phil Agnew. It’s brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network, the audio destination for business professionals. You can learn the science behind great marketing with bite size 20 minute episodes packed with practical advice from world-class marketers and behavioral scientists. And it’s not always about marketing. Great episode. Recently you learned the surprising truths about and tips for beating, stress and anxiety. Sounds like a great program, doesn’t it? Listen to Nudge wherever you get your podcasts.

(00:48): Hello and welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast. This is John Jantsch. My guest today is Amanda Holmes. She is the c e O of Chat Holmes International, which has worked with over 250,000 businesses worldwide. At age 24, she inherited her father’s multi-million dollar enterprise, which specializes in helping companies double their sales. A lot of their works based on the bestselling book, the Ultimate Sales Machine, of which they have a new edition coming out. Amanda’s name will be all over the new edition as well. And she has merged her father’s proven process with her own forward thinking ideas to connect the old school sales process with hybrid, online and offline instant gratification and short attention span that we see in consumers today. So Amanda, welcome back to the show.

Amanda Holmes (01:38): Thank you so much, John. You know what means so much to me that you interviewed my father and then you interviewed me so many years ago and here we are again. It just, it means a lot. I, not a lot of people interviewed my father either,

John Jantsch (01:51): So I I was gonna say, I might be one of the few podcasters who has interviewed you both . Yes.

Amanda Holmes (01:58): I have never heard it from anybody else and I’ve done hundreds of interviews, so you are the only one

John Jantsch (02:03): . That’s funny that, that was about 29, 20 0 9, 20 10, something like that maybe. And podcasting was in its infancy at the time, but somehow I’ve stuck with it

Amanda Holmes (02:15): .

John Jantsch (02:16): So we also have another shared connection. My daughter has actually worked for me for about 12 years. Uh, she is our chief operating officer, so I really kind of have to go there. Didn’t work in the business as a family member. Right. You really brought, came into the business. I would have to think in some ways that was a pretty tall order. Becau, in fact, I think you were studying music in college and you know, not necessarily preparing for a career as a C. Right. So what’s it, I guess I was gonna ask you what’s like working with family, but that’s not really, it wasn’t really your experience. So what was it like really? And I know you’ve told this story many times, what was it like basically being thrust into an ongoing organization, but as a family member?

Amanda Holmes (03:01): Yes, it, well, it was hard because me and my father were very close. I was actually born on his birthday. We shared the same birthday February 13th, and it was as if just the stars aligned. And so losing him was like losing air. It was like I didn’t know where up was or down was. I couldn’t eat, I couldn’t sleep. So getting all of that while at the same time, like I can remember just days after his funeral. And the only reason why I remember that cuz all that time is such a blur, but I just remember all of these flowers around my room from his funeral and I was sitting there and they had just sent me the p and l of all the companies and it was the first time I’d ever seen it. And it just felt like this p and l was never ending.

(03:45): I kept scrolling and scrolling and I just broke down. It was like, how, how is this possible that, so my father battled with cancer for a year and a half before he passed. And he spent 352 nights in the hospital and never once did he spend it alone. So it was me, my mom, and my brother. We just, we rotated spending all nighters with him. So I spent easily a hundred all nighters with my father in the hospital. Never once did he say, Hey Amanda, let me explain to you what my businesses are . Let me explain to you who runs them. Let me tell you about where I’d like this to go. We never had that dialogue and there was time and I speak on that because I think it’s critical that more parents take responsibility for the fact that there are other people that if you leave this world without a plan, you’re hindering them.

(04:42): So I do talk on that every once in a while. But, so it was utterly shocking and it really is. I look back and I think it’s a miracle that we’re here today based on the fact that Right, I knew nothing. I was trying to get over the loss of my father while couple hundred staff, you know, this crazy enterprise. But here we are. I stepped in and it took me two years to step in cuz it just looked like this is crazy talk. I don’t know why I ever would. But then over time I fell in love with our clients. I’ve recognized that there was something that was really beautiful about what my father had built and it could be carried on. It just needed that heart in the center of it to make it all work. And yeah, I increased our leads by 1176% the first year I stepped in and doubled our coaching clients multiple years in a row. And this year we’re up over 300%. And that’s without the book releasing just yet some, it’s a lot of wonderful things. My father had a great system and a great framework for how to grow organizations and I had to learn it from his books and his training programs instead of him explaining it to me. But nonetheless, I think I am probably one of his greatest success stories just because of that. Right.

John Jantsch (05:58): What was hard for you? I mean you, you, you obviously made some changes, you know, what was hard for you to change? I mean, not necessarily resistance, but just really hard for you to even wrap your head around

Amanda Holmes (06:10): Changing. So we had never processed an an order online. My father was very strict around, you know, every sale should come from a salesperson to having a conversation either over the phone or in person. So I can remember the first time that I put some pricing online and I took a moment and it was like, I’m so sorry dad. I know you said this , but times have changed and I have to do it, have to put some of our stuff online. So that was a big, that was a big turning point in learning how to do digital marketing was critical and selling things online. And then also a huge change was for me, the people that I surround myself with, a lot of them were very different than who my father surrounded himself with. So I find that the culture that he thrived in is different than the culture that I thrive in.

(07:02): And making that distinction because at first it was anybody that my father respected, ultimately they would say, well your father said I was the best in the planet on this. And I’d go, okay. And I’d put them up on this pedestal of who was the best, right? Cause my father said he was the best, even though I started realizing that everyone said that my father said they were the best. So then I started reading through his emails to try and figure out what he really thought of them. That was the way that I would find out. And then the next level was okay, just because my father said he was the best, now I have to discern, is this somebody that I can work with? And there were quite a few of them that did not work with me very well. And that’s okay. It’s just a little bit of a different modus opera Ren, but still the strategies are the same. So it was interesting to see that culture shift.

John Jantsch (07:52): So shifting gears a little bit to maybe a more positive, less of a challenge, what’s been the most fun for you?

Amanda Holmes (07:59): ? The marketing and sales part. Oh my gosh. Oh y’all appreciate this John. So I just, you know, I’m in this whole book tour thing going on right now, right? I just went to all these different trade shows. I spoke at HubSpots inbound, that’s where I saw that you’re in HubSpot Network. Congratulations on that. That’s awesome. So I went there with a four foot billboard strapped to my back cuz I was looking for a way for people that my father teaches, the first thing you need in a trade show is to get noticed. Yeah. And I was googling like, oh, maybe we’ll do a backpack and we’ll design a backpack or something. And then I found, I typed in human billboard and this huge thing, it’s a backpack, the straps, but it’s, and it lights up, it glows like the billboard sign. So I’ve been walking through all these trade shows with this four foot billboard on my back. I call her Bessie now because I’m very fond of her. And on the last day of trafficking conversion, actually they shut me down because I was creating such a buzz and generating so many sales that the sponsors, the booths were getting jealous

John Jantsch (09:04): .

Amanda Holmes (09:06): But that’s been a blast. And just being really creative about ways to get attention and then converting those, that attention into sales and leads and sales. That’s a ton of fun for me.

John Jantsch (09:19): Would you say that you’re, uh, and I know this is gonna sound sort of stereotypical, but would you say that your music background, your arts background, has brought a level of creativity that maybe didn’t exist?

Amanda Holmes (09:31): Absolutely. So the new edition of the book The Forward, instead of saying Dear Reader, I instead said Dear dad. And that was a, and it something that Julian Eon, my book coach at the time, had suggested I do. And when I wrote it, everyone that read that majority of grown men that read it would cry reading it. And they thought they, out of all the every page, every sentence, I made sure that it was some way to double sales. But that letter to my dad, everyone said lead with that cuz that’s going to touch more people than just doubling sales techniques. And I put that into a video actually. And that’s been what I’ve been using to promote the book. So to me that video is a music video. I wrote the lyrics, even though I’m not singing them, they’re written. But everything that I had as a songwriter, I put into that video. To me, that’s the single that came out with this new edition of the book, which is kind of funny to think about. But man, it is hitting people in a completely different way than I never expected. And it was the most nerve-wracking thing on the planet to put that thing out. I really thought that. I didn’t think that people would like it, but everybody kept saying, I love it, I love it. You should put that out. And it’s been such a loving response. So yeah, that, that songwriter in me, I think.

John Jantsch (10:55): Are you an agency owner, consultant or coach that works with business owners? Then I want to talk to you about adding a new revenue stream to your business that will completely change how you work with clients. For the first time ever, you can license and use the Duct Tape Marketing system and methodology in your business through an upcoming three day virtual workshop. Give us three days and you’ll walk away with a complete system that changes how you think about your agency’s growth. The Duct Tape Marketing System is a turnkey set of processes for installing a marketing system that starts with strategy and moves to long-term retainer implementation engagements. We’ve developed a system by successfully working with thousands of businesses. Now you can bring it to your agency and benefit from all the tools, templates, systems and processes we’ve developed. To find out when our next workshop is being held, visit dtm.world/workshop. That’s DTM world slash workshop. , describe who C HHI at CH Holmes and international works with. Who’s your typical client?

Amanda Holmes (12:02): Yes. Okay, I’ll answer that by asking you a question. And you probably know the answer to this. What percentage of businesses do you think make it to a million in annual sales?

John Jantsch (12:11): I don’t know the exact answer other than it’s relatively small. Not

Amanda Holmes (12:15): Really small. Yeah. If

John Jantsch (12:16): You had to guess, I’m gonna say 9%.

Amanda Holmes (12:19): Okay, let’s close, let’s close 5% of companies. Make it to a million of that 0.08%, make it to 5 million of that 1.5%, make it to 10 million so it gets a little bit better. then 0.004%, make it to a hundred million and beyond. So what we teach is how to get from a million to five, from 5 million to 10, from 10 million to a hundred million and beyond. Because it’s actually not about our product or service, which majority of entrepreneurs think, yes, if I just tweak this a little bit more, then I’ll get more. Right. If that was true, McDonald’s wouldn’t be the number one grossing hamburger joint in the world. Right? It’s a terrible burger. It’s skills it takes to grow the business and skills can be developed. So we assist entrepreneurs to grow from that one to five, from five to 10, from 10 to a hundred million and beyond.

John Jantsch (13:12): One of the core concepts, I have actually not, not seen what you’ve done in the second edition yet, but in the, certainly in the first edition. Well, and, and I know it’s a core concept of your coaching, is this, uh, concept of the Dream 100. I wonder if you could kind of describe that. Cause I know that’s a big E for

Amanda Holmes (13:28): You. Yes, it’s the fastest, least expensive way to double sales. This one strategy has doubled the sales of more companies than any other. My father invented it working for billionaire, Charlie Munger, co-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway. So he doubled the sales of nine different companies for Charlie all within 12 to 15 months, and several of them multiple years consecutively. So he realized that he had a system for doubling sales and it went something like this. So he was given a list of 2200 potential prospects and they said, okay, go cold. Call these 2200. But when he did some research, he realized that only 167 of them purchased 95% of the space. So instead of going after 2200, he led an intensive dream 100 to just those 167. Now it being in their face and their place and their space. What can we do to provide the most value for them?

(14:20): For him, back then it was direct mail, cold calling and faxing. So twice a month he was doing direct mail. Four times a month he was cold calling and following up with a fax in an email every once in a while. And he did that for months. For the first four months he got nothing, which un talked around the office like what is this? Why is this expert in sales? And he hasn’t generated a thing. But in the sixth month he closed the largest contract that the industry had ever seen. And then subsequently after that doubled the doubled. Now. So by definition, there’s always a smaller number of better buyers than there are all buyers. That means that marketing and selling to them is cheaper than marketing and selling to all buyers. And I’ve even, as I look at this and what you’ll see in the new edition is so many people get, they see the Dream 100 and they go, oh my gosh, how do I do direct mail?

(15:09): How can I make this work with direct mail? And how do I get a hundred people on my list? You’re missing the point if you’re super focused on just those two things. Because we have so many marketing mediums in our use today. I show how I used a dream. One, I focused on one potential dream client and I followed up with them every single day using social media. Every time they post something on social, I’d comment with something of value. Every time they posted another thing I’d add another piece of value and another comment. And another I, for every single day, for three months, I commented on every single thing that this person said. And three months in they came back to me and said, Hey, I’d like to buy 650 books of the Ultimate Sales Machine. I’m still reaping the benefits of that three months of pigheaded discipline and determination.

(15:57): Today they bought another thousand books. It’s actually, it was the CEO of ClickFunnels, so Dave Woodward I did this with. So the point is, it’s about picking who’s one person that could completely change your world. And then can you multiply that even by, you could have four, you could have 10, I’m calling it the target 12. It doesn’t have to be a hundred, right? The whole point is just to get laser focused and follow up with pigheaded discipline and determination, whichever medium that may be. If you wanna use direct mail, that’s great because it will land cuz nobody’s doing direct mail, right? Yeah. But if you wanna do it on Instagram dms, that’s where I did it to get that client. Right. It could be on LinkedIn, it could be on V voice drops on cell phones

John Jantsch (16:41): Or all of them. Right? Or all of them. Or all of them, right?

Amanda Holmes (16:43): . Yeah. If you only have a hundred, right? And you’re sending, if you’re doing Facebook ads to them, if you are sending them text messages, if you’re arriving at their door, they’re like, you are everywhere. It’s like, yeah, I’m only everywhere to the select 10, right? Select a hundred. So they’re just amazed, right?

John Jantsch (16:58): Yeah. And I think what’s so important about that lesson is you can now afford to spend money and time and energy that is gonna just swamp what anybody else is doing, you know, to that same person because they’re spraying it, you know, 10,000 people at a time.

Amanda Holmes (17:16): Absolutely. We had a client, so I went, I’ve created these bootcamps and a client went through the bootcamp, they went after four people that had already said no to their services. It was a hard, no, I’m definitely not interested. And then he led with an education to those four. After he gave the presentation of an education, he closed 8.4 million worth of sales in just six weeks. Six weeks. And the average sales rep would sell 8 million in an entire year. He did it in six weeks. Cuz he targeted his dream. He only needed four. Dream four to generate 8.4 million.

John Jantsch (17:54): So one of the challenges, I th I, you kind of alluded to this, we’re so focused on digital right now, you, you have yourselves firmly in what you’re calling old school processes, but they really, in some ways, some of the old school processes are working better than ever, aren’t they?

Amanda Holmes (18:12): Absolutely. I mean, take what I just did at trade shows. It’s shocking how many people at trade shows have no idea how to have a face-to-face conversation. I’d walk up to a booth and 90% of them had no idea how to start asking questions. You know, I’d ask, what do you do? And they have no idea. They look starstruck. Like what? You’re talking to me in real life. I don’t know what to do. . It’s so bizarre how we’ve lost the frameworks and the basic foundational principles. Everyone thought, oh, a billboard. Yeah, that’s brilliant. But then I also QR code there so that I could collect people that were taking pictures. Anyways, the first few days they were taking pictures of me cuz they thought it was hysterical. But then they didn’t realize that now I’m converting them cuz they’re clicking on that I’m getting their email and then they’re buying.

(19:00): So it’s blending of the two. My funnel online got me the sales, but me walking around with a four foot billboard on my back in a trade show got the attention in the press. And now I’ve taken vi video that I got from influencers in the space that were recording me cuz they thought it was hilarious. And I’m using that in my ads and I’m repurposing it, right? So there’s so many different ways that I think in person too. It was just at a mastermind with Grant Cardone two weeks ago, and there were 80 people in the room, all of which would’ve loved to talk to Grant Cardone. He walked out of the room and nobody followed him. And I’m looking around the room going, are you kidding me? That’s a billionaire. I’d love to talk to Grant Cardone. Why not? So I run out there and I start to have a dialogue with him. It’s like, it’s as if we only can communicate through a text or on right in an in a social media aspect. He was right there, live breathing. And I handed him the book and I said, you should watch Dear Dad, it’ll make you cry. I’ll send you a book. And he’s like, I will definitely cry from that. I’m sure I will. I love that. Thank you .

John Jantsch (20:01): Amanda, thanks for dropping by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast. Tell people where they can find all the work that you’re doing and certainly get a copy of the new book or the rev revised updated, fully updated book.

Amanda Holmes (20:12): Yes. Ultimate sales machine.com is where everybody can pick up the book, but it’ll give you a bunch of extra bonuses that you wouldn’t get on Amazon. And then if you wanna online, I’m a lot of different places, but I spend more of my time on Instagram. My name Amanda Holmes was taken, so I’d use my salsa name Amanda Dita. So you can find me on Instagram at manita holmes.

John Jantsch (20:34): All right, awesome. Well, great having you back on the show again and uh, hopefully we’ll run into you again, one of these days out there on the road.

Amanda Holmes (20:42): Thank you John. It was such a

John Jantsch (20:43): Blessing. Hey, and one final thing before you go. You know how I talk about marketing strategy, strategy before tactics? Well, sometimes it can be hard to understand where you stand in that, what needs to be done with regard to creating a marketing strategy. So we created a free tool for you. It’s called the Marketing Strategy Assessment. You can find it @ marketingassessment.co check out our free marketing assessment and learn where you are with your strategy today. That’s just marketingassessment.co. I’d love to chat with you about the results that you get.

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